compression wave


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Related to compression wave: rarefaction wave

compression wave

[kəm′presh·ən ‚wāv]
(fluid mechanics)
A wave in a fluid in which a compression is propagated.

compression wave

compression waveclick for a larger image
A shock wave that forms on the surface of an airfoil moving through the air at supersonic speeds. The reverse phenomenon is an expansion wave. Also called bow wave. See also bow shock wave and expansion wave.
References in periodicals archive ?
The increased peak exhaust pressure suggested that a stronger compression wave was formed due to the higher in-cylinder pressure at EVO.
Resuming the results presented above, we can state that the compression wave, whose shape is initially continuous and smooth enough, propagates with a constant speed [V.
Also, the various frequencies in the compression wave provide additional information.
Although information can be extracted from compression wave (P-wave) data alone, the inclusion of shear waves (S-waves) can be used as an additional source of observations to further constrain and narrow uncertainty in the results.
Therefore a compression wave is created in the rod.
A high speed impact, though, will chemically mix the materials, igniting them and leading to a compression wave and significant overpressure.
As the cone begins a forward movement it generates the start of a compression wave.
Longitudinal impedance measures the resistance of the fluid to propagation of a compression wave.
It was then shown that by using the density of the slinky, a compression wave is no different mathematically than the transverse wave and that it has all of the basic attributes mentioned above.
50 cal AP projectiles, the compression wave created by the impact could potentially be fatal even without any penetration, making these systems impractical for personal protection.
Equation (15) is the equation of elastic compression wave travelling at the phase velocity of [square root of ([lambda] + 2G)/[rho]].