compulsion

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Related to compulsory: compulsory service, Compulsory military service

compulsion

Psychiatry an inner drive that causes a person to perform actions, often of a trivial and repetitive nature, against his or her will

compulsion

[kəm′pəl·shən]
(psychology)
An irresistible, impulsive act performed by an individual against his conscious will and usually arising from an obsession.
References in periodicals archive ?
This branch calls on the university management to abide by the existing agreement on the avoidance of compulsory redundancies and thereby avoid compulsory redundancies and to enter into negotiations with BUCU.
Sources said if compulsory voting rule is implemented, it could cross 90 per cent.
Tsvetanov expressed hope that the majority of Bulgarians would back compulsory voting.
The apparent position adopted by UCU Branch that it will only work constructively with the university if the threat of compulsory redundancy is removed is unfortunate and is inconsistent with the premise of working for the greater good of the university, its students and its employees.
Sabine Kuntner of Austria placed 11th in the Compulsory Test of the individual female competition.
Compulsory voting is law in more than 20 countries in the world, with Australia the best-known.
While Kuwait has a compulsory scheme for expatriates since 2000,Saudi Arabia has compulsory health cover for all foreign workers and their dependents since 2005 in the private sector, rolled out in stages by the number of employees up to 2008.
Compulsory motor in China has been unprofitable since its introduction in 2006, and foreign insurers have held a relatively small share of the motor segment due to regulatory restrictions.
COMPULSORY LICENSING UNDER THE INDIAN PATENTS (AMENDMENT) ACT OF 2005 IV.
The next level of enforcement is found in states where drivers are required to purchase insurance under compulsory insurance laws (COMPULSORY).
Although the three-judge panel declared that "The Constitution requires that schools permit religious expression, not religious proselytizing," it also went on to say that forbidding students from reciting prayers even in compulsory settings would result "in the `establishment of disbelief' -- atheism -- as the State's religion.