conation

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conation

mental aspects of doing, as opposed to feeling (affection) and thinking (cognition). The term now has limited currency, but was used by PARSONS.
References in periodicals archive ?
I have witnessed a great deal of conative stress in this mode between firm owners who might be Preventative FF and their new planner who might be Initiating FF.
Over the years, the anarchist aesthetic outlined by Newman would influence the work of later American artist such as Donald Judd and Allan Kaprow who, albeit in very different ways, borrowed Newman's notion of art as an affective experience that increased the conative striving of the individual and that challenged authoritative modes of being.
In communication and marketing research, the conative component (behaviour) mostly refers to intended behaviour; in some studies, it refers to the actual behaviour (Communicatie KC 2017).
The cases of conative collapse discussed above show that these theories have very implausible implications.
Within this research, specifically regarding the soccer environment, we used the conative attitude as a dependent variable, since the affective relations will be approached as independent variables in the fanaticism and involvement constructs.
2010) from the tourism perspective found that affective loyalty has a stronger effect on conative loyalty than cognitive loyalty.
This is the main difference between engineered and emerging atmospherics: while both cover the basic conative need of withdrawal, in the latter case the connection is only phenomenological.
Schiffman and Kanuk [13] in their model of TRA incorporates cognitive, affective, and conative components.
Similarly, the direct effects of involvement have been examined on both awareness and conative processing (Walraven et al.
Emotions cannot just be embodied appraisals, since emotions have valence (they can be either positive or negative) and they are also conative states that motivate us to act.
That is, to the extent of the considerable diminishing of the phatic and conative functions.
Aptitude, learning, and instruction, Volume 3: Conative and affective process analyses, (pp.