concern


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concern

a commercial company or enterprise

Concern

 

one of most developed forms of monopolist associations, characterized by a unity of ownership and control. It is the prevailing form of monopoly in contemporary developed capitalist countries. Member enterprises are subject to the control of the financial magnates heading the concern. Sometimes a special company, the holding company, is set up to act as a managing body of the concern; the holding company will have a controlling interest in many different companies.

Concerns were first founded in Germany after World War I. They developed further with the growth of new forms of production concentration, above all the integration in the ferrous and nonferrous metal industry, the coal and oil processing industries, and the chemical industry. In the 1920’s the concentration and centralization of capital became widespread in the USA. There the process was vertical; that is, it consisted of the combination of successive stages of the production process, from the initial raw materials to various finished products.

After World War II, the concerns, influenced by the scientific-technological revolution and the intensification of uneven economic development and the competitive struggle among the capitalist monopolies, assumed new features: their intersectorial diversification, because of the specific conditions of capital accumulation, became more pronounced; fundamental and applied research grew; and the number of large scientific laboratories and experimental shops and departments increased. After the war, the number of international concerns increased greatly.

The decisive advantages of the concerns in the sharp competitive struggle stem from large-scale integrated production, constant introduction of advanced technology, the output of new types of products, the concentration of patents, the possession of production secrets, the accumulation of know-how, and the development of self-financing.

Bourgeois apologists try to represent the concern as an efficient and progressive organization. However, the activity of a concern clearly shows how technological progress under capitalism enriches small groups of large-scale owners and managers and how the progressive aspects are organically interwoven with economic stagnation.

REFERENCES

Politicheskaia ekonomiia sovremennogo monopolisticheskogo kapitalizma, vol. 1. Moscow, 1970. Chapter 6.
Khmel’nitskaia, E. L. Ocherki sovremennoi monopolii. Moscow, 1971.

IU. B. KOCHEVRIN

References in classic literature ?
It is not a man's duty, as a matter of course, to devote himself to the eradication of any, even to most enormous, wrong; he may still properly have other concerns to engage him; but it is his duty, at least, to wash his hands of it, and, if he gives it no thought longer, not to give it practically his support.
He was looked on as sufficiently belonging to the place to make his merits and prospects a kind of common concern.
Yes," continued Elinor, gathering more resolution, as some of the worst was over, "Colonel Brandon means it as a testimony of his concern for what has lately passed--for the cruel situation in which the unjustifiable conduct of your family has placed you--a concern which I am sure Marianne, myself, and all your friends, must share; and likewise as a proof of his high esteem for your general character, and his particular approbation of your behaviour on the present occasion.
The emperor and his train alighted from their horses, the empress and ladies from their coaches, and I did not perceive they were in any fright or concern.
the story which followed, of his designs on Miss Darcy, received some confirmation from what had passed between Colonel Fitzwilliam and herself only the morning before; and at last she was referred for the truth of every particular to Colonel Fitzwilliam himself-- from whom she had previously received the information of his near concern in all his cousin's affairs, and whose character she had no reason to question.
What you ask is merely an affair of discipline and does not concern me," said the queen.
Edgar Caswall was far too haughty a person, and too stern of nature, to concern himself about poor or helpless people, much less the lower order of mere animals.
To begin perfect happiness at the respective ages of twenty-six and eighteen is to do pretty well; and professing myself moreover convinced that the general's unjust interference, so far from being really injurious to their felicity, was perhaps rather conducive to it, by improving their knowledge of each other, and adding strength to their attachment, I leave it to be settled, by whomsoever it may concern, whether the tendency of this work be altogether to recommend parental tyranny, or reward filial disobedience.
The great concern now was to break the matter to Mr Allworthy; and this was undertaken by the doctor.
They were nearer the things that did concern him, such as music.
This is a large question, which need not, in its entirety, concern us at present.
It was their opinion, and mine too, that they would be troubled no more with the savages, or if they were, they would be able to cut them off, if they were twice as many as before; so they had no concern about that.