concert


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concert,

in music, public performance of a group of musical compositions. Originally the word referred simply to a group of musicians playing together; concerts by a solo performer are properly called recitals. The earliest recorded public concerts were organized by a London violinist, John Banister, in 1672. Many orchestral concerts were given in the 18th cent., and early in the 19th cent., which saw great development of concert life; public concerts of chamber music were often given. In the American colonies, the first concert on record took place in Boston in 1731.

Concert

 

a public performance by artists of a definite, pre-arranged program. Concerts may be musical (symphonic, chamber, piano, violin), literary (recitals), or variety (light vocal and instrumental music, humorous stories, skits, and circus acts). Several performers or just one (solo concert) may participate.

In the USSR concerts are organized by concert tour associations—for example, Goskontsert, Soiuzkontsert, Roskontsert, and Moskontsert—and by philharmonic societies on the republic and oblast levels; in capitalist countries this is done by private entrepreneurs (impresarios or managers).

concert

1. 
a. a performance of music by players or singers that does not involve theatrical staging
b. (as modifier): a concert version of an opera
2. in concert
a. (of musicians, esp rock musicians) performing live

Concert

(Concert Communications Services, Reston, VA) A joint venture of AT&T and British Telecom (BT) that provided global communications services, including private, point-to-point voice and data circuits, Internet services and X.25 packet switching and frame relay. In October 2001, AT&T and BT announced their intention to dissolve Concert and return all assets to the parent companies. See Tymnet.
References in classic literature ?
I thought what would come of that concert last night.
A common passion or interest will, in almost every case, be felt by a majority of the whole; a communication and concert result from the form of government itself; and there is nothing to check the inducements to sacrifice the weaker party or an obnoxious individual.
I grant you I have not your discriminative faculty of hearing; for the concert of all Lineland which gives you such intense pleasure, is to me no better than a multitudinous twittering or chirping.
The murmur soon became more distinct; it now seemed like a distant concert of human voices accompanied by brass instruments.
But I was unable to accept your invitation, having promised to accompany my mother to a German concert given by the Baroness of Chateau-Renaud.
Still the walls seemed to be closing on him; they appeared to be in concert with his enemies.
Buckingham and Bragelonne admitting De Guiche into their friendship, in concert with him, sang the praises of the princess during the whole of the journey.
They were to act in concert, also, against all interlopers, and to succor each other in case of danger.
The theatre or the rooms, where he was most likely to be, were not fashionable enough for the Elliots, whose evening amusements were solely in the elegant stupidity of private parties, in which they were getting more and more engaged; and Anne, wearied of such a state of stagnation, sick of knowing nothing, and fancying herself stronger because her strength was not tried, was quite impatient for the concert evening.
The robbers, who had been not a little frightened by the opening concert, had now no doubt that some frightful hobgoblin had broken in upon them, and scampered away as fast as they could.
Half of that which belongs to the individuals should be at the extremity of the country, the other half near the city, so that these two portions being allotted to each person, all would partake of land in both places, which would be both equal and right; and induce them to act in concert with greater harmony in any war with their neighbours: for when the land is not divided in this manner, one party neglects the inroads of the enemy on the borders, the other makes it a matter of too much consequence and more than is necessary; for which reason in some places there is a law which forbids the inhabitants of the borders to have any vote in the council when they are debating upon a war which is made against them as their private interest might prevent their voting impartially.
So it is that I can see her and hear her now on a hundred separate occasions beneath the awning beneath the stars on deck below at noon or night but plainest of all in the evening of the day we signalled the Island of Ascension, at the close of that last concert on the quarter-deck.