concertina

(redirected from concertinas)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

concertina

(kŏnsûrtē`nə), musical instrument whose tone is produced by free reeds. It was invented by Sir Charles Wheatstone in 1829. It is a chromatic instrument similar to the accordionaccordion,
musical instrument consisting of a rectangular bellows expanded and contracted between the hands. Buttons or keys operated by the player open valves, allowing air to enter or to escape. The air sets in motion free reeds, frequently made of metal.
..... Click the link for more information.
, but its bellows are attached to hexagonal blocks having handles and buttons (finger pistons), and it is smaller. It is mainly associated with popular music.

Concertina

 

a pneumatic musical instrument; an accordion possessing a chromatic scale but no built-in chords. It was invented in the early 19th century (patented by C. Wheatstone, London, 1829). There are six varieties of the instrument, ranging from the piccolo to the contrabass. The size of the most common concertina, the soprano, is 150–180 mm. The instrument usually has a hexagonal or octagonal shape. It has a compass of two to four octaves. Used both as a solo and orchestral instrument, the concertina is most widespread in England.

concertina

a small hexagonal musical instrument of the reed organ family in which metallic reeds are vibrated by air from a set of bellows operated by the player's hands. Notes are produced by pressing buttons
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, there is an interesting account of how styles of playing have changed over the years and how concertina playing within the folk revival was influenced by former melodeon players who favoured chorded accompaniments to the early octave style.
In the chapter 'The Concertina in England' there is a section on a concertina player called Walter Savage which states: 'He played Anglo for the Abingdon Morris Side before the Great War, but after the war the side did not regroup.
Among tomorrow evening's highlights is the Anglo Concertina concert at the Bridge House Theatre featuring top players from both sides of the Atlantic, including Brian Peters, John Kirkpatrick, Chris Sherburn of Last Night's Fun and American concertina ace Jody Kruskal.
Because of the popularity of free-reed instruments, Wheatstone became interested in developing (and subsequently invented) the concertina in 1827.
Atlas thoroughly explains the advantages of the Wheatstone concertina by descriptions and illustrations of mechanical features, materials, and possible types of fingerings for executing polyphonic and homophonic textures.
Meanwhile bosses at the Horniman Museum in south east London defended their pounds 250,000 lottery handout to buy 700 historic concertinas.
Several sides to the west of the Pennines were using Anglo concertinas by the early 1900s, and it seems unlikely that all of them took their cue from the Kimbers; and although the father's notoriously strict admonition that 'those are the notes you play, and you don't play any others' suggests that William senior was the source of his son's chordal approach, it's by no means certain that the style was unique to them.