conclusion


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conclusion

1. the last main division of a speech, lecture, essay, etc.
2. Logic
a. a statement that purports to follow from another or others (the premises) by means of an argument
b. a statement that does validly follow from given premises
3. Law
a. an admission or statement binding on the party making it; estoppel
b. the close of a pleading or of a conveyance
References in classic literature ?
You build up your sentences well; you clinch your conclusions in a workmanlike manner.
Comparison of what he has accomplished with what I have accomplished has led to startling conclusions.
And out of the data of past experience, I reached certain conclusions.
With those introductory words, he briefly reverted to the earlier occurrences of the day, and then added, by way of commentary, a statement of the conclusions which events had suggested to his own mind.
It would have been sheer waste of time--to say nothing of its also implying a want of confidence in my wife--if I had attempted to set things right by disputing Mercy's conclusion.
After five years' work I allowed myself to speculate on the subject, and drew up some short notes; these I enlarged in 1844 into a sketch of the conclusions, which then seemed to me probable: from that period to the present day I have steadily pursued the same object.
For if, as you say, justice is the obedience which the subject renders to their commands, in that case, O wisest of men, is there any escape from the conclusion that the weaker are commanded to do, not what is for the interest, but what is for the injury of the stronger?
I did not mean to abuse the cloth; I only said your conclusion was a
With this conclusion we may leave the emotions and pass to the consideration of the will.
And now, the hand that traces these words, falters, as it approaches the conclusion of its task; and would weave, for a little longer space, the thread of these adventures.
I had already come to the conclusion, since there were no signs of a struggle, that the blood which covered the floor had burst from the murderer's nose in his excitement.
He then went into the matter of the smear on the paint, and stated the conclusions he drew from it--just as he had stated them