concurrent

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concurrent

At the same time. It implies that multiple processes are taking place simultaneously. See concurrent operation and concurrency.
References in classic literature ?
Each house may determine the Rules of its Proceedings, punish its Members for disorderly Behavior, and, with the Concurrence of two-thirds, expel a Member.
Every Order, Resolution, or Vote to which the Concurrence of the Senate and House of Representatives may be necessary (except on a question of Adjournment) shall be presented to the President of the United States; and before the Same shall take Effect, shall be approved by him, or being disapproved by him, shall be repassed by two thirds of the Senate and House of Representatives, according to the Rules and Limitations prescribed in the Case of a Bill.
Is it an objection against the new Constitution, that it empowers the Senate, with the concurrence of the Executive, to make treaties which are to be the laws of the land?
Vincy, I must repeat, that you will not get any concurrence from me as to the course you have pursued with your eldest son.
The implied reproaches against her father--her father, who was lying there in a sort of living death--neutralized all her pity for griefs about tablecloths and china; and her anger on her father's account was heightened by some egoistic resentment at Tom's silent concurrence with her mother in shutting her out from the common calamity.
Further, to enable me to cast this variety of subjects somewhat into the shade, and to express my judgment regarding them with greater freedom, without being necessitated to adopt or refute the opinions of the learned, I resolved to leave all the people here to their disputes, and to speak only of what would happen in a new world, if God were now to create somewhere in the imaginary spaces matter sufficient to compose one, and were to agitate variously and confusedly the different parts of this matter, so that there resulted a chaos as disordered as the poets ever feigned, and after that did nothing more than lend his ordinary concurrence to nature, and allow her to act in accordance with the laws which he had established.
I feel that I have no right to mention this matter without his concurrence.
Le president du Conseil de la concurrence, Habib Jaballah, a indique, dans une interview accordee au journal Ettounisya ' que le projet de revision de la loi de la concurrences et des prix est necessaire pour proteger le consommateur tunisien et faire baisser les prix des produits de consommation.
He constructs a typology of concurrences, identifying concurrences as "expansive" (attempting to expand the holding or supplement the reasoning of the majority opinion), "doctrinal" (offering a different theory for supporting the Court's result), "limiting" (seeking to limit or qualify the majority holding), "reluctant" (reluctantly bowing to precedent or to the perceived need to produce a majority opinion on an important issue), or "emphatic" (emphasizing a particular aspect of a Court's holding and functioning largely as a means of clarification).
Separate concurrences, like dissents, are a common feature of many common law court decisions.
From the resulting data, the author generates a typology of separate concurrences and contends that most express significant doctrinal disagreements with the reasoning of the majority rather than minor quibbles.
Pellman recommended that the supervisors adopt a policy that meetings among board deputies not be used to develop concurrences on actions to take on board items.