concussion

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concussion

a jarring of the brain, caused by a blow or a fall, usually resulting in loss of consciousness

concussion

[kən′kəsh·ən]
(engineering)
Shock waves in the air caused by an explosion underground or at the surface or by a heavy blow directly to the ground surface during excavation, quarrying, or blasting operations.
(medicine)
A state of shock following traumatic injury, especially cerebral trauma, in which there is temporary functional impairment without physical evidence of damage to impaired tissues.
References in periodicals archive ?
2, 2015 /PRNewswire/ -- EyeGuide Focus detects concussions in 10 seconds by recording and interpreting athletes' eye movements.
The 28-year-old Omani-Irish sports scientist was forced to retire in April due to the effects of multiple concussions.
Although concussions usually are caused by a blow to the head, they can also occur when the head and upper body are violently shaken.
It may involve loss of consciousness although less than 10% of concussions involve loss of consciousness.
There's been a lot of national attention on taking concussions seriously and allowing them to heal before returning to play.
If concussion is diagnosed, a clear, graduated return to play programme is set out, with specific, age-appropriate guidance for adults, children and teenagers, along with clear warnings for anyone suffering two or more concussions during a year.
Unlike some parents who are reluctant to allow their children to play football because of the risk of concussions and long-term brain injuries, Mrs.
There are inherent risks in playing football, but in some ways the sport has borne unfairly the brunt of the blame for sports concussions - brain injuries that result in temporary, or in some cases lasting, disruption of normal brain function.
Governor Pat Quinn today signed legislation to help reduce and prevent concussions among high school athletes.
Sports-Related Concussions in Youth: Improving the Science, Changing the Culture
Accelerated Rehabilitation, which has a dedicated Concussion Management practice, is actively engaged with athletes across the Midwest who suffer concussions during their sport seasons.
Washington, Jan 14 ( ANI ): A new study suggests that teens with a history of concussions are more than three times as likely to suffer from depression, than those who have never had a concussion.