conduction band


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Related to conduction band: Fermi level

Conduction band

The electronic energy band of a crystalline solid which is partially occupied by electrons. The electrons in this energy band can increase their energies by going to higher energy levels within the band when an electric field is applied to accelerate them or when the temperature of the crystal is raised. These electrons are called conduction electrons, as distinct from the electrons in filled energy bands, which, as a whole, do not contribute to electrical and thermal conduction. In metallic conductors the conduction electrons correspond to the valence electrons (or a portion of the valence electrons) of the constituent atoms. In semiconductors and insulators at sufficiently low temperatures, the conduction band is empty of electrons. Conduction electrons come from thermal excitation of electrons from a lower energy band or from impurity atoms in the crystal. See Band theory of solids, Electric insulator, Semiconductor, Valence band

conduction band

[kən′dək·shən ‚band]
(solid-state physics)
An energy band in which electrons can move freely in a solid, producing net transport of charge.
References in periodicals archive ?
In order to calculate the electron drift velocity for large electric fields, consideration of conduction band satellite valleys is necessary (Yu, Carbona, 2001).
Coefficients for the temperature dependence of the conduction band extrema that are used in Eq.
This can be explained such that charge carriers that are trapped in traps close to conduction band gain the energy to jump conduction band as the temperature is increased, therefore at higher temperatures trap levels close to conduction band are emptied and new energy levels of interface traps are restructured.
The fundamental absorption, which corresponds to electron excitation from the valence band to conduction band (Gosh et al.
The electrons jump between two well defined energy levels in the conduction band of the active-layers (quantum wells) and in doing so emit photons of energy equal to the energy difference between these levels.
The vertical stacking mode, however, carries a cost; the steric bulk of the organic substituent tends to force the stacked columns apart, reducing the inter-columnar contacts and thereby the widening the valence to conduction band gap.
In indirect band gap semiconductor, the transition from valence band to conduction band should always be associated with a phonon of the right magnitude.
Figure 3 indicates an absorption edge at about 840 nm due to the optical transition from the valence band and conduction band.
In the frame of the band theory, the transition of electrons occurs (a) from the valence band to the conduction band, (b) from the valence band into a trap and then to the conduction band, and (c) from a trap to another trap.