configuration

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configuration

1. Physics Chem
a. the shape of a molecule as determined by the arrangement of its atoms
b. the structure of an atom or molecule as determined by the arrangement of its electrons and nucleons
2. Psychol the unit or pattern in perception studied by Gestalt psychologists
3. Computing the particular choice of hardware items and their interconnection that make up a particular computer system

configuration

(kon-fig-yŭ-ray -shŏn) See aspect.

Configuration

The form of a figure as determined by the arrangement of its parts, outline, or contour.

configuration

see FIGURATION.

Configuration

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

Traditionally, the term configuration was used to refer to any aspect. In contemporary astrology, the term is reserved for sets of interrelated aspects involving three or more planets, such as T-squares, grand trines, and so forth. By extension, the configuration is sometimes used to refer to the pattern presented by the entire horoscope.

Configuration

 

(of molecules). In stereochemistry the configuration characterizes the spatial arrangement of atoms or groups of atoms in an asymmetric atom, in an asymmetrically substituted double bond, in a small (rigid) ring, and in the central atom of complex compounds.

The differences in configuration are determined by the existence of two types of stable stereoisomers: geometrical and optical isomers. Chemical and particularly physical methods of investigation are widely used in determining the configuration of molecules. Thus, using a special X-ray technique, it has been possible to demonstrate, for example, the spatial arrangement of substituents around asymmetric carbon atoms (designated by asterisks) in a molecule of tartaric acid—dextrorotatory (I) and levorotatory (II):

The configuration of a molecule does not alter with changes in its conformation, that is, the rotation of individual parts of a molecule relative to one another about single bonds. Sometimes (for example, in the chemistry and physical chemistry of macromolecular compounds), the term “configuration” is used in a broader sense to include the entire spatial model of a molecule.

V. M. POTAPOV

configuration

[kən‚fig·yə′rā·shən]
(aerospace engineering)
A particular type of specific aircraft, rocket, or such, which differs from others of the same model by the arrangement of its components or by the addition or omission of auxiliary equipment; for example, long-range configuration or cargo configuration.
(chemistry)
The three-dimensional spatial arrangement of atoms in a stable or isolable molecule.
(computer science)
For a computer system, the relationship of hardware elements to each other, and the manner in which they are electronically connected.
(electricity)
A group of components interconnected to perform a desired circuit function.
(mathematics)
An arrangement of geometric objects.
(mechanics)
The positions of all the particles in a system.
(systems engineering)
A group of machines interconnected and programmed to operate as a system.

configuration

The spatial arrangement of wood particles, chips, flakes, or fibers used in particleboard, fiberboard, etc.

configuration (as applied to the airplane)

A particular combination of the position of the moveable elements, such as wing flaps, landing gear, etc., which affect the aerodynamic characteristics of the airplane (ICAO).

configuration

The makeup of a system. To "configure software" means selecting programmable options that make the program function to the user's liking. To "configure hardware" means assembling desired components for a custom system as well as selecting options in the user-programmable parts of the system. "Configurability" refers to the hardware or software's ability to be changed and customized. See settings.
References in periodicals archive ?
The future of predictive models seems to lie in a combination of indicator- and event-based quantitative analysis and qualitative or configurative analysis that relies on structural analogies and common patterns among cases.
One of the better known examples of the configurative approach, the Miles and Snow typology, has been the subject of extensive theoretical and empirical examination (Hambrick 1983; McDaniel and Kolari 1987; Shortell and Zajac 1990; Zahria and Pierce 1990).
Utilizing a versatile, configurative integration architecture for rapid implementation, superior scalability, low total cost of ownership, and high ROI better ensures success.
My method is what Sidney Verba called "disciplined" configurative inquiry, quoted in Peter A.