confirm

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confirm

In air traffic control phraseology, it means, “Have I correctly received the following …?” or “Did you correctly receive the message?”
References in periodicals archive ?
60) In-depth reviews of newspaper articles, interviews with local prosecutors, judges, and the candidate herself, as well as flank confirmability assessments, could have averted this mishap.
Second, the criteria of generality, understanding, control, and fit emerged from the grounded theory literature itself (Strauss and Corbin 1990), These criteria were assessed as follows: interviews were lengthy to allow for different aspects of the phenomenon to emerge (generality); executive summaries were provided to participants and asked if it reflected their stories (understanding); participants did have some control over certain variables (control); and lastly, the criteria of fit was addressed through the methods mentioned earlier to control for credibility, dependability, and confirmability (see Table 2 for a summary).
Hence, to establish "trustworthiness" of qualitative research, credibility, dependability, transferability and confirmability need to be established.
The results were circulated to participants and stakeholders at two stages in the concurrent data collection and analysis as part of the participatory research approach to establish the results' confirmability (Lincoln & Guba, 1985).
Lincoln and Guba (1986) offered four measures for evaluating methodological rigor and accuracy in qualitative research: credibility, transferability, dependability, and confirmability.
Confirmability relates to objectivity and is measured in quantitative content analysis by assessing inter-rater reliability.
In addition, an external Japanese researcher conducted an audit trail (Lincoln & Guba; Skrtic, 1985) to assess both confirmability (the degree to which the assertions were grounded in the data), and dependability (the degree to which the research procedures were consistent and valid).
To ensure the confirmability (Lincoln & Guba, 1985) of results, guides had to be recognized by others in their communities as "much more than volunteers," but they could not be chosen on the basis of their profession (that is, teachers or social workers).
In order to add credence to this work, Marshall and Rossman's (1995) trustworthiness features of credibility, transferability, dependability, and confirmability were addressed in several ways.
Four features of naturalistic inquiry served as standards for designing the study and provide methodological rigor, credibility, dependability, confirmability, and transferability (Lincoln & Guba, 1985).
Trustworthiness of the data was established through a confirmability audit (Patton, 2002) and through participant negotiation.
Reacting to the Bork struggle, both Presidents Bush and Clinton emphasized confirmability in choosing nominees.