confiscate

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Related to confiscation: Confiscation of property

confiscate

1. seized or confiscated; forfeit
2. having lost or been deprived of property through confiscation
References in classic literature ?
That he had watched the times for a time of action, and that they had shifted and struggled until the time had gone by, and the nobility were trooping from France by every highway and byway, and their property was in course of confiscation and destruction, and their very names were blotting out, was as well known to himself as it could be to any new authority in France that might impeach him for it.
That was worth something to him, because a word from us to the Custom-House people would have been enough to get some of these packages he gets from Paris and Brussels opened in Dover, with confiscation to follow for certain, and perhaps a prosecution as well at the end of it.
During the Revolution, the Pyncheon of that epoch, adopting the royal side, became a refugee; but repented, and made his reappearance, just at the point of time to preserve the House of the Seven Gables from confiscation.
The aggressor, moreover, lost caste in the estimation of his equals and this was considered by the British as of more consequence than the confiscation of his land.
It was as much injured by its charges in fitting out an armament against the Spaniards, during the time of the Armada, as by the fines and confiscations levied on it by Elizabeth for harbouring of priests, obstinate recusancy, and popish misdoings.
For I am and always have been one of those natures who must be guided by reason, whatever the reason may be which upon reflection appears to me to be the best; and now that this chance has befallen me, I cannot repudiate my own words: the principles which I have hitherto honoured and revered I still honour, and unless we can at once find other and better principles, I am certain not to agree with you; no, not even if the power of the multitude could inflict many more imprisonments, confiscations, deaths, frightening us like children with hobgoblin terrors (compare Apol.
While the regime gradually intensified the economic persecution of German Jewry, it was only in 1938 that the government introduced comprehensive confiscation measures, including property registrations, punitive taxes, and systematic currency restrictions.
He was jailed for three-and-a-half years last October and West Midlands Police have successfully applied for a confiscation order under the Proceeds of Crime Act 2002.
The Limits of Sovereignty: Property Confiscation in the Union and the Confederacy during the Civil War.
Church Robbers and Reformers in Germany, 1525-1547: Confiscation and Religious Purpose in the Holy Roman Empire.
He explained that under the Proceeds of Crime Act 2002, which came into effect in March 2003, confiscation orders that are fixed by the court must be made or the defender will be forced to serve more time in prison.
The appeals court held that confiscation of the prisoner's long-held word processor, which allegedly occurred shortly after he submitted letters that were critical of the prison to a mail room for mailing, was sufficient to state a claim of retaliation for his exercise of his First Amendment rights.