congelifraction

congelifraction

[kən¦jel·ə¦frak·shən]
(geology)
The splitting or disintegration of rocks as the result of the freezing of the water contained. Also known as frost bursting; frost riving; frost shattering; frost splitting; frost weathering; frost wedging; gelifraction; gelivation.
References in periodicals archive ?
and is therefore subjected to harsh climatic conditions, translated into heavy snow, torrential thaws, congelifraction and heavy erosion.
One of the most typical physical breakdown processes is congelifraction, which is determined by the porosity and the size distribution of the empty spaces within the rock.
We thought at first, that this fact could be due to differential preservation, caused by the strong congelifraction in the area that would have detached or even destroyed the vertical surfaces suitable for the engravings.
Frost wedging caused by the ice, also known as gelivation or congelifraction, occurs along the planes of weakness of rocks (the result of their tectonic past) and is at the same time combined with the fracture planes resulting from the stresses caused by sudden changes in temperature.