defect

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Related to congenital defect: congenital heart defect, myeloma, Juvenile Arthritis

defect

Crystallog a local deviation from regularity in the crystal lattice of a solid

Defect

In lumber, an irregularity occurring in or on wood that will tend to impair its strength, durability, or utility value.

defect

[′dē‚fekt]
(science and technology)
An irregularity that spoils the appearance or impairs the usefulness or effectiveness of an object or a material by causing weakness or failure.

defect

In wood, a fault that may reduce its durability, usefulness, or strength.

defect

References in periodicals archive ?
Investigations suggest that these hernias can be acquired through congenital defects in the diaphragm (Larrey's space) (6,12).
Comparison of the occurrence of congenital defect was done with presence of consanguineous relationship in parents, degree of consanguinity of parents.
Oral clefts (OCs) are a heterogeneous and important group of congenital defects with prevalence of 1:600-1,000 among newborns.
Eight of these 18 (44%) had established diagnoses of genetic or congenital defect conditions, as substantiated by a review of medical records.
The characteristics of an infant born with congenital defects violate the parents' expectations of what their baby should be and are among the most common triggers of disturbed parent-infant relationships (Bassoff, 1982).
Dubai: A 58-year-old British expatriate successfully underwent surgery at Aster Hospital Mankhool to correct a congenital defect of a displaced hip that was hampering her daily activities, her surgeon said.
This is a rare congenital defect which occurs only in one in a million people," said Dr Santosh.
Ectopic ureter orifice, which produces enuresis ureterica is a relatively rare congenital defect, detected and treated mainly in children.
His son Aamir, 12, suffers from a congenital defect called syndactyly -- or in simpler terms, webbed hands.
Sarah, who was born with no left hand due to a congenital defect, has been swimming at world-class level since 1992 and holds 48 world records.
Progressive vaccinia occurs among those who are immunosuppressed because of a congenital defect, malignancy, radiation therapy, or AIDS.

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