conjugate roots

conjugate roots

[′kän·jə·gət ′rüts]
(mathematics)
Conjugate complex numbers which are roots of a given equation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Selecting any other pair of quadratic conjugate roots, we see that they should be -b [+ or -] e' [square root of D] with rational b and e' > 0.
one real root and a pair of complex conjugate roots.
There is one real root apparent at x = 1 but no indication whatsoever of the whereabouts of the complex conjugate roots.
i] (i [less than or equal to] 2t - 1) should be lower than the others except the conjugate roots of every [[alpha].
For each conjugate roots group, we only calculate one [phi]([H.
The points of intersection are (-2, 1) and (-2, -1), so the complex conjugate roots are z = -2 [+ or -] i.
This also leads to the n-th roots of unity, although the location of these n-roots relative to the Cartesian plane is commonly misunderstood (see Stroud (1986, Programme 2, Theory of Equations); he (incorrectly) places the complex conjugate roots in the Cartesian plane at one of the turning points of a cubic equation.
An indication is given in Figure 2, based on the a priori knowledge that the real part of both complex conjugate roots is -0.
which is recognised as the total distance along the H'-axis between a pair of conjugate roots.
has shown further that if the complex coefficients are considered as vectors, then for complex conjugate roots to occur a, b, c must be collinear.
two-dimensional x-y plot of the quadratic equation does not reveal the location of the complex conjugate roots, and the interested student might well be forgiven for asking, "Where exactly are the roots located and why can't I see them?
DELTA] < 0, in which case complex conjugate roots are always found.