conjunction


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Related to conjunction: preposition

conjunction

Conjunctions are used to express relationships between things in a sentence, link different clauses together, and to combine sentences.
There are four main types of conjunctions: coordinating conjunctions, subordinating conjunctions, correlative conjunctions, and conjunctive adverbs.
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conjunction,

in astronomy, alignment of two celestial bodies as seen from the earth. Conjunction of the moon and the planets is often determined by reference to the sun. When a body is in conjunction with the sun, it rises with the sun, and thus cannot be seen; its elongationelongation,
in astronomy, the angular distance between two points in the sky as measured from a third point. The elongation of a planet is usually measured as the angular distance from the sun to the planet as measured from the earth.
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 is 0°. The moon is in conjunction with the sun when it is new; if the conjunction is perfect, an eclipseeclipse
[Gr.,=failing], in astronomy, partial or total obscuring of one celestial body by the shadow of another. Best known are the lunar eclipses, which occur when the earth blocks the sun's light from the moon, and solar eclipses, occurring when the moon blocks the sun's light
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 of the sun will occur. Mercury and Venus, the two inferior planets, have two positions of conjunction. When either lies directly between the earth and the sun, it is in inferior conjunction; when either lies on the far side of the sun from the earth, it is in superior conjunction.

conjunction,

in English, part of speechpart of speech,
in traditional English grammar, any one of about eight major classes of words, based on the parts of speech of ancient Greek and Latin. The parts of speech are noun, verb, adjective, adverb, interjection, preposition, conjunction, and pronoun.
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 serving to connect words or constructions, e.g., and, but, and or. Most languages have connective particles similar to English conjunctions. In some languages words, phrases, or clauses may be connected by a suffix added to a word, e.g., -que and -ve in Latin.

conjunction

(kŏn-junk -shŏn) The alignment of two bodies in the Solar System so that they have the same celestial longitude as seen from the Earth (see illustration at elongation). The Sun and Moon are in conjunction at new Moon. An inferior planet can be in conjunction twice in one revolution – at inferior conjunction when the planet lies between the Sun and the Earth and at superior conjunction when the planet lies on the opposite side of the Sun from the Earth. See also opposition.

Conjunction

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

A conjunction is, as the name implies, an aspect in which two points—such as two planets—are close enough that their energies join. A conjunction is a major aspect, regarded as harmonious or inharmonious depending on the planets involved. For example, a conjunction involving planets such as Jupiter and Venus would exert a generally fortunate influence, while a conjunction involving Saturn or Pluto would be challenging, to say the least. A conjunction is sometimes called the aspect of prominence because it brings the planets involved into prominence in a chart.

Conjunction

 

a connecting word that links together the words and parts of a sentence. Conjunctions may also link entire sentences on the principle of coordination and subordination.

According to their meaning, coordinating conjunctions may be copulative, or connective (Russian i, “and”; ni. . . ni, “neither . . . nor”; kak . . . tak, “both . . . and”), disjunctive (Hi, “or”; to . . . to, “sometimes . . . and sometimes”; libo, “or”) or adversative (a. “whereas”; no, “but”; odnako, “however”). Subordinating conjunctions are generally polysemous, and their meaning may be ascertained only in context.

According to their morphological structure, conjunctions may be simple (a, i, no, esli, “if) or complex (potomu chto, “because”; tak kak, “since”). Many subordinating conjunctions coincide in form with pronouns, adverbs, and particles; fixed preposition-noun phrases may also act as conjunctions (v silu togo chto, “owing to the fact that”; po mere togo kak, “in proportion as”). The conjunction differs from the conjunctive word in that the conjunction is not a part of the sentence.

conjunction

[kən′jəŋk·shən]
(astronomy)
The situation in which two celestial bodies have either the same celestial longitude or the same sidereal hour angle.
The time at which this conjunction takes place.
(mathematics)
The connection of two statements by the word “and.”

conjunction

1. Astronomy
a. the position of any two bodies that appear to meet, such as two celestial bodies on the celestial sphere
b. the position of a planet or the moon when it is in line with the sun as seen from the earth. The inner planets are in inferior conjunction when the planet is between the earth and the sun and in superior conjunction when the sun lies between the earth and the planet
2. Astrology an exact aspect of 0° between two planets, etc., an orb of 8° being allowed
3. Logic
a. the operator that forms a compound sentence from two given sentences, and corresponds to the English and
b. a sentence so formed. Usually written p&q, p⋀q, or p.q., where p,q are the component sentences, it is true only when both these are true
c. the relation between such sentences

conjunction

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