conjuror

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Related to conjurors: conjurers

conjuror

, conjurer
a person who practises magic; sorcerer
References in classic literature ?
I only wanted to say that we must be off early to-morrow morning, my dear, because unless we get the start of the dogs and the conjuror, the villages won't be worth a penny.
Very early next morning, Short fulfilled his promise, and knocking softly at her door, entreated that she would get up directly, as the proprietor of the dogs was still snoring, and if they lost no time they might get a good deal in advance both of him and the conjuror, who was talking in his sleep, and from what he could be heard to say, appeared to be balancing a donkey in his dreams.
The very dulness of this grovelling-minded savage, who continued gazing at the supposed conjuror with a sort of stupid admiration, opposed now the only obstacle to the complete success of his artifice.
If your conjuror is not with his friends in the morning, my young men shall look for him.
My grandfather used to go to Conjuror Mynterne, out at Owlscombe, and a clever man a' were, so I've heard grandf'er say," continued Mr Crick.
You know a conjuror gets no credit when once he has explained his trick, and if I show you too much of my method of working, you will come to the conclusion that I am a very ordinary individual after all.
And I once made six children happy at Christmas when the conjuror didn't come, entirely with soot--applied externally.
The same feint, with the same polite dexterity, she foisted on Mrs Meagles, as a conjuror might have forced a card on that innocent lady; and, when her future daughter-in-law was presented to her by her son, she said on embracing her, 'My dear, what have you done to Henry that has bewitched him so
Such performers became the addressees, and subjects, of his writing; Dickens corresponded with magicians, in particular the hugely popular Austrian conjuror Ludwig Dobler (Letters 4: 113-14), and depicted humbler conjurors in his fiction.
The book includes the departing Punch professor in William Macgregor's bleak view of Doing the Provinces, as well as the rather more cheerful picture in William Reed's Leith Races, with Punch taking his place alongside pipers, fiddlers, conjurors and performing animals.
Sounds like magic, and it is - all three men are playing conjurors.
NOW that we have seen off the season of good will and are into New Year resolutions and 20% VAT territory, the Downing Street conjurors seem to have run out of tricks to lift some of our post-festive gloom.