conkers


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conkers

Brit a game in which a player swings a horse chestnut (conker), threaded onto a string, against that of another player to try to break it
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But Tracey blasted back: "Katie didn't ask that all the conkers be removed.
Autumn was always so magical because the leaves created an amazing carpet of colour and it became a challenge to find the conkers.
Competitors can use their own conkers, but park rangers will also provide some, and the string must be just four inches long, although this is increased to six inches for the final.
Conkers beat the Rubik's Cube, which launched in 1979, into second place in the poll conducted for Debenhams.
Climb aboard the Conkachoo train as often as you like and travel between the two Conkers sites, Waterside and Discovery.
COMPETITORS are today going crackers over the Irish Conker Championships.
Conkers opened to the public in spring 2001 and since then has welcomed more than one million visitors through its doors.
Conkers, near Ashby-de-la-Zouch, is the ideal place for relaxing, playing and learning about life in the British woodland.
A LEAMINGTON man conker-ed any nerves he may have had to triumph in the final at the 2014 World Conker Championships.
For weeks, enthusiasts have been scouring the city's parks and gardens on the hunt for the perfect winning conker and practising their smashing swing in an attempt to scoop this year's crown.
The Campaign For Real Conkers says many conkers have fallen early from yellowing horse chestnut trees before they are ripe enough to be used for the popular pastime.
Children at Adlington Primary School near Macclesfield, Cheshire, were invited to bring conkers in for a contest.