Connotation

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Connotation

 

an additional, attendant meaning of a linguistic unit.

Connotation includes semantic or stylistic elements which are connected in a certain way with the basic meaning and are superimposed upon it. Connotation is used to express emotional and evaluative nuances. For example, the word metel’ “snowstorm,” which denotes a strong wind with snow, can be used connotatively in such combinations as pukh kruzhilsia metel’iu, “the down swirled around like a snowstorm,” and metel’ ognennykh iskr vzvilas’ v nebo, “a shower (literally, snowstorm) of fiery sparks soared skyward.” The idea of connotation includes an element of the word’s grammatical meaning that predicts the occurrence of another word in the text (for example, a preposition predicts a noun in a certain case). The notion of connotation in this sense was introduced into linguistics by K. Bühler.

References in periodicals archive ?
To the narrator goes the evidence; to his vocalization of the changing "spirit of the town" goes the desire to know in all its connotative permutations.
The initial misunderstanding means that the connotative vice of the caption affixes an incorrect label to an image, and creates a sign which is misinformed.
Ultimately, aside from adhering to a masculinist auteurist canon, her selections reduplicate not only the connotative coding of pre-code Hollywood but much of its pathology as well.
In their book entitled Communication for Business and Professions, Bradley and Baird reveal that the connotative meanings and emotional aspects of a written document are important.
Asking students to predict the meaning of words in isolation and again in context helps them to use their logical, problem solving skills to examine the roots or origins of words and find connotative and denotative meanings (Moates, 1999).
Analyzing his career in reverse until the hiatus that preceded Jew, Lesser argues that it inaugurated a "Laudian" phase for Vavasour--and, alongside other plays like Dekker's Wonder of a Kingdom and The Noble Spanish Soldier, with it the category of "Laudian drama"--because "Jew" had by now become a (self-applied) code for Puritan, a figure for recalcitrant nonconformity more connotative of domestic schism than of the alien infiltration it had represented in the 1590s; to the extent that this reading remains at all alive to what we consider the moral ambivalence of the play, in the England of Marlowe's Cyprus the Christians are exposed as hypocritical and corrupt only because Barabas's divisiveness has corrupted them.
What consequently differentiates Shakespeare from Marlowe, Logan explains, is Shakespeare's "emotionally connotative language" (156) and his greater accommodation to political and social orthodoxy, although what Logan means when he describes Titus Andronicus as displaying an "orthodox morality" remains questionable (38).
However, synonyms often contain different connotative meanings that influence the reader's understanding.
When the connotative potential of the poem's English language associations are combined with the connotative potential of these bi-lingual puns, a recognizably European scene can be reconfigured as a distinctly Maori practice.
In such a case, naming is not as important as the connotative features and the inspired actions.
Without even starting a formalist enquiry of the image one could run the photograph through many more connotative frames.