Connotation

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Connotation

 

an additional, attendant meaning of a linguistic unit.

Connotation includes semantic or stylistic elements which are connected in a certain way with the basic meaning and are superimposed upon it. Connotation is used to express emotional and evaluative nuances. For example, the word metel’ “snowstorm,” which denotes a strong wind with snow, can be used connotatively in such combinations as pukh kruzhilsia metel’iu, “the down swirled around like a snowstorm,” and metel’ ognennykh iskr vzvilas’ v nebo, “a shower (literally, snowstorm) of fiery sparks soared skyward.” The idea of connotation includes an element of the word’s grammatical meaning that predicts the occurrence of another word in the text (for example, a preposition predicts a noun in a certain case). The notion of connotation in this sense was introduced into linguistics by K. Bühler.

References in periodicals archive ?
In other words, people interact with words connotatively, not denotatively.
As should the uniformity of the construct of the professor that circulates globally--the professor who is connotatively not a sellout, because coded in casual dress, but participates in the selling all the same.
One may also add that his milieu (the Castilian plains of Spain, so loaded and rich a cinematic locale) is resolutely rural and connotatively timeless whereas Antonioni's tended to the urban, and to specific, localized contemporaneity.
In this context, the Heimlichkeit of Adriana's home with its table spread, coffers of money to bail people out of jails, with servants coming to and departing from there, pig falling into the pit and capon burning, doors being locked and opened--whether the staged house is connotatively flat, Plautine or early modern, as critics continue to quibble over this issue--constitutes one of the three significant spatial domains in the play and is associated with propositional appraisals, while the streets and even the Abbey give rise to both types of appraisal.
The question of imperialism is slippery and connotatively loaded.