consequent

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consequent

1. (of a river) flowing in the direction of the original slope of the land or dip of the strata
2. Logic the resultant clause in a conditional sentence
3. affirming the consequent Logic the fallacy of inferring the antecedent of a conditional sentence, given the truth of the conditional and its consequent, as if John is six feet tall, he's more than five feet: he's more than five feet so he's six feet
4. an obsolete term for denominator

consequent

[′kän·sə·kwənt]
(geology)
Of, pertaining to, or characterizing movements of the earth resulting from the external transfer of material in the process of gradation.
(mathematics)
The second term or denominator of a ratio.
The second of the two statements in an implication.
References in periodicals archive ?
Since not only d' = ad but, in principle, any concrete manifestation of d' = f(d) could be understood as a rule for transformation of antecedent into consequent, it is not an exaggeration to say that we have an unlimited number of possibilities.
one of the qualities of this complex transformation is that certain different durations of the antecedent correspond to identical durations of the consequent, for example: [MUSICAL NOTES NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] [right arrow] [MUSICAL NOTES NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] and [MUSICAL NOTES NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII].
all the durations of the antecedent, when passing into the consequent, become identical.
For imitation in inversion the correspondence between the pitches of the antecedent and the consequent could appear in the following manner (Example 6).
all the pitches, when passing into the consequent, become identical;
4] is the corresponding pitch in the consequent and vice versa;
Let j be the ordinal number of a sound in the antecedent, j' the ordinal number in the corresponding sound in the consequent, n the total amount of sounds in a melody.
or in an even more concentrated manner: s' = f(s), where s is the sound of the antecedent, s' the sound of the consequent, f the rule of transformation of s into s', if to consider that the short entry and the more extensive ones are equal in meaning.
Nontraditional transformations are more complex and many of them are much more so than traditional ones; the alterations of the antecedent are more profound, and the connection between the antecedent and the consequent is less apparent.