conservation of momentum


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Related to conservation of momentum: Conservation of Angular Momentum

Conservation of momentum

The principle that, when a system of masses is subject only to forces that masses of the system exert on one another, the total vector momentum of the system is constant. Since vector momentum is conserved, in problems involving more than one dimension the component of momentum in any direction will remain constant. The principle of conservation of momentum holds generally and is applicable in all fields of physics. In particular, momentum is conserved even if the particles of a system exert forces on one another or if the total mechanical energy is not conserved. Use of the principle of conservation of momentum is fundamental in the solution of collision problems. See Collision (physics), Momentum

conservation of momentum

The principle that in any system of interacting bodies the total linear momentum in a fixed direction is constant provided that there is no external force acting on the system in that direction. The angular momentum of a system of bodies rotating and/or revolving about a fixed axis is also conserved provided that no external torque is applied.

conservation of momentum

[‚kän·sər′vā·shən əv mə′mən·təm]
(mechanics)
The principle that, when a system of masses is subject only to internal forces that masses of the system exert on one another, the total vector momentum of the system is constant; no violation of this principle has been found. Also known as momentum conservation.
References in periodicals archive ?
This rearrangement, which appears as equation (8) at the end of this section, will make very clear the limits imposed within the Schwarzschild metric by the conservation of momentum and energy.
Einstein was careful to show that the field equations, nevertheless, correspond to the conservation of momentum and energy [2, Equations 47a] and thus have a nexus to physical reality.
The Schwarzschild metric, as a solution to the field equations, also corresponds to the conservation of momentum and energy.
The conservation of momentum and energy, as expressed in the Schwarzschild metric, requires that the magnitude of the sum of the velocities is always equal to the constant c.
In the previous section, the Schwarzschild metric in (1) has been rearranged as (8) to provide a more concrete picture of the relationships necessary for conservation of momentum and energy.
4 Equation (8) and limits imposed by the conservation of momentum and energy
The arrangement of the Schwarzschild metric in (8) allows for a more concrete explanation of the limitations inherent in the Schwarzschild metric that necessarily result from the conservation of momentum and energy.
This section has shown that because of the conservation of momentum and energy--as expressed by the Schwarzschild metric arranged as in (8)--matter from space cannot cross the Schwarzschild radius R to get to a location where r < R.
According to the conservation of momentum and energy described by the Schwarzschild metric, see (8) and (15), a particle can never from space cross the Schwarzschild radius R of a compact mass M.
In the Schwarzschild metric, no reference frame can cross its critical radius because to do so would be a violation of the conservation of momentum and energy [4].
For a precise description of how in the Schwarzschild metric gravity affects time based on the conservation of momentum and energy, see [4, Eq.

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