Associate

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associate

[ə′sō·sē‚āt]
(psychology)
An item or event that is linked to another in the mind of an individual.

Associate

Closely connected as in function or office, but having secondary or subordinate status; an architect who has an arrangement with another architect to collaborate in the performance of service for a project, or a series of projects.

associate

In an architectural firm, a member of an architect’s staff who has a special employment agreement.
References in periodicals archive ?
For more information about the partnership contact Darren Reynolds of Consociate Dansig at 217.
By 1992 a part-time consociate program director was needed, and the discernment process resulted in Lieberman's taking on the position.
In front of friends, families, sisters and other consociates, the new consociate expresses his or her desire to belong to the community along with the gifts he or she brings and his or her expectations from the community.
Occasionally a consociate will live with a group of sisters for a time.
It is important to re-emphasize that this contingent relationship between my strategies and those of my consociates spoke a certain truth because that, after all, was the point of the Jimi experiment with the civic.
Law expects its consociates to have a capacity for purposive-rational decision making.
The anthropological nexus between solidarity and presuppositions of communicative reason "is rooted in the realisation that each person must take responsibility for the other because as consociates all must have an interest in the integrity of their shared life context in the same way.
The Aboriginal people of the region took up these regional identities, and came to identify themselves and their consociates as 'Coen people'.
Whilst the ways in which money is spent or distributed may well transform its meaning among Aboriginal consociates (Martin 1995:7), there is nonetheless a clear sense among Coen people that money is made by an individual's own efforts, and belongs to that person, despite the possibility of others demanding it from them.
While members conjointly established outstations across the region, they continued to maintain norms regarding use of country that differentiated between their consociates in relation to particular places and 'countries'.
The healing ritual has no such aims, but addresses two dimensions of that life-world in which both people and spirits dwell as consociates who share their intersubjective time.
Places for the Kamula are always saturated with meanings - an extraordinarily dense array of named and unnamed places come to represent one's life ('this is where I shot a pig', 'this is where our house was') as well as the lives of past and present consociates.