consort

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consort

1. esp formerly
a. a small group of instruments, either of the same type, such as viols, (a whole consort) or of different types (a broken consort)
b. (as modifier): consort music
2. the husband or wife of a reigning monarch
3. a ship that escorts another
References in periodicals archive ?
Consorts of the Caliphs was originally written between the 7th and 13th centuries by T<-a>j al-D<-i>n eAl<-i> ibn al-S<-a>E<-i>, a scholar of Baghdad during the final years of the Abbasid dynasty.
While Consorts is a short book, just 144 pages, it wasa long time in coming.
Under existing laws and precedent, the wives of ruling Kings become Queen Consorts, but the husbands of sovereign Queens do not have the right to any title.
It is also time now to resolve the difference in the naming of royal consorts by either adopting the title Princess to accompany the reigning King in line with the present arrangement, namely, Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip or give any future male consort to a reigning Queen the title of King, preferably the latter.
Loades has established himself as an expert on Tudor history and here he devotes himself to Tudor queens, both consorts and queens regnant.
UK) examines the repertoire of late fifteenth-century instrumental consorts.
She also exposes the vulnerabilities of many innocent sons, especially the heirs, who often became the victims of imperial politics--preyed on by ambitious consorts, contenders to the throne, regents or the emperor.
Born to Rule: Five Reigning Consorts, Granddaughters of Queen Victoria.
The consorts of our previous kings during the 20th century have each made their mark on the British way of life.
My grandchildren's ages range from 18 to just 14 months and two of them, Ben and Keiran, who are 13 and 11, were my consorts when I lit the civic bonfire in Nuneaton last November.
We must ask whether all of these women were consorts or whether some of them were allowed, as secondary wives, to use a title MI.
Biographies of rulers, their consorts, mistresses and favourites, continued to be written, but they often belonged to a tradition of belles lettres and lacked rigorous contextual analysis.

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