constitutional unit

constitutional unit

[‚kän·stə′tü·shən·əl ′yü·nət]
(chemistry)
An atom or group of atoms that is part of a chain in a polymer or oligomer.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lord Wigley said: "[It] is only since 1922 that the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - the present constitutional unit which is known as the United Kingdom - has been in existence.
According to Corinna van Wyk, project coordinator of the Legal Assistance Centre's human rights and constitutional unit, it is clear that many debtors are being overreached by some of the banking institutions and their lawyers.
Patented is an absorbent article comprising an absorbent core, the absorbent core comprising a primary water-absorbing agent wherein the primary water-absorbing agent apprises (i) water-absorbing resin particles obtained by polymerizing an acid group-containing unsaturated monomer; (ii) a compound that includes a constitutional unit derived from polyalkyleneglycol, that is different from the unsaturated monomer; and (iii) a polyvalent metal salt.
I read in the Echo that Mr A Trench, of the constitutional unit, University College London, is calling for 20 more AMs in the National Assembly.
But the regional executive, which oversees the entire North West, sent details of the events to Labour's National Constitutional Unit in London.
Meanwhile, Scots Secretary Michael Forsyth seized on a report by the independent Constitutional Unit.
The Welsh Executive Committee then took advice about how to proceed from the party's national constitutional unit.
Alan Trench of University College London's constitutional unit believes another 20 members will be necessary if the Cardiff Bay Assembly is to make the most of additional powers which come into operation later this year.
Welsh Secretary Peter Hain will tonight deliver a speech entitled Changing for Good - Devolution: The Silent Revolution to the Constitutional Unit in Westminster.
Scrutiny Under Devolution committees in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, a report by the Constitutional Unit at UCL, suggests the new assemblies have had more success altering the executive's behaviour.