consumptive coagulopathy


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consumptive coagulopathy

[kən′səm·div ‚kō‚ag·yə′läp·ə·thē]
(medicine)
Reduction in one or more of the blood elements involved in coagulation as the result of marked blood clotting.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cryoprecipitate is used in cases of hypofibrinogenaemia, which most often occurs in the setting of massive haemorrhage or consumptive coagulopathy, factor VIII deficiency and Von Willebrand disease as an alternate to specific component therapy.
Congestive heart failure and consumptive coagulopathy may develop depending on the size of the hemangioma.
The most common causes of coagulation disorders in the patients with massive bleeding or massive transfusions are: coagulopathy due to loss of blood type, dilutional coagulopathy, consumptive coagulopathy, hyperfibrinolysis, acidosis, hypothermia, anemia and electrolyte imbalance [26].
Mr X's less-than-optimal coagulation profile (Table 1) can be explained by complete defibrination caused by venom-induced consumptive coagulopathy (VICC), which can manifest within 30 minutes of envenomation (Therapeutic Guidelines, 2012; WCH, 2014).
Of interest was that an association was also evident in patients with BMTB, suggesting that a consumptive coagulopathy (such as DIC) is a likely contributor to the low platelet count frequently seen in these patients.
8,13) Cases have been reported of larger lymphangiomas complicated by consumptive coagulopathy, bleeding, hypersplenism, and portal hypertension.
Secondary conditions associated with the virus include acute renal failure, multi-organ failure, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and consumptive coagulopathy -- a clotting disorder that leads to hemorrhage, organ failure and death.
A hemangioma that rapidly increases in size has the potential to trap platelets and cause a consumptive coagulopathy.
6,7 Occasionally TA may be associated with Kasabach-Meritt syndrome which causes platelet trapping and consumptive coagulopathy.
In consumptive coagulopathy a platelet count of less than 50,000/[micro]l and fibrinogen level less than 100mg/dl are better predictors of hemorrhage than PT and aPPT.
It is possible for the haemangioma itself to become a predisposing factor for haemorrhage; in cases of large or multiple haemangiomata, platelets may become sequestrated and activated in the tumours, resulting a in a consumptive coagulopathy and disseminated intravascular coagulation (the Kasabach-Merrit syndrome) [14].
Other causes of haemorrhage in DI could be coagulation defects, capillary fragility, consumptive coagulopathy and platelet dysfunction (3,10,11).