contact

(redirected from contact allergy)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal.
Related to contact allergy: contact dermatitis, Allergic contact dermatitis

contact

1. 
a. a junction of two or more electrical conductors
b. the part of the conductors that makes the junction
c. the part of an electrical device to which such connections are made
2. any person who has been exposed to a contagious disease
3. an informal name for contact lens
4. of or relating to irritation or inflammation of the skin caused by touching the causative agent

contact

See eclipse.

Contact

 

the geometric concept signifying that at a certain point, two curves (or a curve and a surface) have a common tangent line or two surfaces have a common tangent plane. The order of contact is a characteristic of the proximity of two curves (a curve and a surface, or two surfaces) in the neighborhood of their common point.

contact

[′kän‚takt]
(electricity)
(engineering)
Initial detection of an aircraft, ship, submarine, or other object on a radarscope or other detecting equipment.
(fluid mechanics)
The surface between two immiscible fluids contained in a reservoir.
(geology)
The surface between two different kinds of rocks.

contact

A part which is an electric conductor and which provides a low-resistance path for current flow upon mating with another conducting part with which it is designed to operate.

contact

i. An air traffic control term, which, when transmitted on the radio, means “Establish radio contact with … ”
ii. Visual contact by the pilot with another aircraft (friendly, hostile, or unidentified), or object, or target on the ground.
iii. To pick up the target on radar.
iv. A warning call by the pilot when starting a piston engine to the person swinging the propeller to indicate that the ignition system is about to be put on.
v. A mechanical hookup between a tanker and a receiver aircraft.
vi. The act of an aircraft touching down on a runway or another surface after being airborne, as in “the moment of contact.”
vii. Flying in weather and at an altitude from where ground features can be seen continuously, as in contact flying.

contact

A metal bar or strip in a plug or smart card that touches a corresponding metal object in a socket or reader in order to enable current to pass. Contacts may be made of precious metals to avoid corrosion. See pin and smart card.
References in periodicals archive ?
Foti C, Bonamonte D, Mascolo G, et al: The role of 3-dimethylaminopropylamine and amidoamine in contact allergy to cocamidopropylbetaine.
Menezes de Padua CA, Schnuch A, Lessmann H, et al: Contact allergy to neomycin sulfate: results of a multifactorial analysis.
For further information about food do allergies and intolerance, contact Allergy UK at www.
RIFM) sponsored, global study on the true prevalence of contact allergy to fragrances is now available from the RIFM web site at http://www.
A contact allergy or boredom resulting in overgrooming could also result in fur loss, so consider a change in his bedding and more toys to rule out these possible causes.
WAIKOLOA, HAWAII -- Contact allergy to a corticosteroid molecule is considerably underdiagnosed--and it's no wonder why.
Hypersensitivity to perfumes is the most common contact allergy in adults.
Contact allergy to tylosin and cobalt in a pig-farmer.
Examples of contact allergy include reactions to flea products, dog beds, disinfectants, or any substance that may irritate the skin.
Where it makes a difference," he says, "is that if you don't recognize that infants and young children can develop contact allergy, then you may not look for an allergen, and you'd miss part of the treatment, which would be eliminating the allergen from the environment or avoiding it.
Frequency of contact allergy to lanolin, mercapto mix, epoxy resin, paraben mix and quaternium-15 were relatively low, while no positive reaction was obtained to formaldehyde in any case.
As part of the fragrance industry's overall objective to minimize fragrance contact allergy in the general population, the QRA approach for assessing sensitivity to fragrance ingredients is now being used as the basis for establishing product safe use levels published in the International Fragrance Association (IFRA) Standards.