contact

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contact

1. 
a. a junction of two or more electrical conductors
b. the part of the conductors that makes the junction
c. the part of an electrical device to which such connections are made
2. any person who has been exposed to a contagious disease
3. an informal name for contact lens
4. of or relating to irritation or inflammation of the skin caused by touching the causative agent

contact

See eclipse.

Contact

 

the geometric concept signifying that at a certain point, two curves (or a curve and a surface) have a common tangent line or two surfaces have a common tangent plane. The order of contact is a characteristic of the proximity of two curves (a curve and a surface, or two surfaces) in the neighborhood of their common point.

contact

[′kän‚takt]
(electricity)
(engineering)
Initial detection of an aircraft, ship, submarine, or other object on a radarscope or other detecting equipment.
(fluid mechanics)
The surface between two immiscible fluids contained in a reservoir.
(geology)
The surface between two different kinds of rocks.

contact

A part which is an electric conductor and which provides a low-resistance path for current flow upon mating with another conducting part with which it is designed to operate.

contact

i. An air traffic control term, which, when transmitted on the radio, means “Establish radio contact with … ”
ii. Visual contact by the pilot with another aircraft (friendly, hostile, or unidentified), or object, or target on the ground.
iii. To pick up the target on radar.
iv. A warning call by the pilot when starting a piston engine to the person swinging the propeller to indicate that the ignition system is about to be put on.
v. A mechanical hookup between a tanker and a receiver aircraft.
vi. The act of an aircraft touching down on a runway or another surface after being airborne, as in “the moment of contact.”
vii. Flying in weather and at an altitude from where ground features can be seen continuously, as in contact flying.

contact

A metal bar or strip in a plug or smart card that touches a corresponding metal object in a socket or reader in order to enable current to pass. Contacts may be made of precious metals to avoid corrosion. See pin and smart card.
References in classic literature ?
But the knife had fortunately, we ought to say skillfully, come in contact with the steel busk, which at that period, like a cuirass, defended the chests of women.
The brass-mounted hilt lay in contact with some parts of the fire.
In Tita at any rate a grateful susceptibility to human contact had not died out, and contact of a limited order there would be if I should come to live in the house.
He was obliged to advance with outstretched hands to avoid contact with the boughs, and discovered that to hit the exact spot from which he had started was at first entirely beyond him.
Strickland made no particular impression on the people who came in contact with him in Tahiti.
At the end of a few moments his foot came in contact with an obstacle; he stumbled and fell.
It is an illusion that youth is happy, an illusion of those who have lost it; but the young know they are wretched, for they are full of the truthless ideals which have been instilled into them, and each time they come in contact with the real they are bruised and wounded.
Fresh from the degrading influences of the slave plantation and the coal-mines, it was a rare privilege for me to be permitted to come into direct contact with such a character as General Armstrong.
Karataev had no attachments, friendships, or love, as Pierre understood them, but loved and lived affectionately with everything life brought him in contact with, particularly with man- not any particular man, but those with whom he happened to be.
In this way I came into living contact with literature again, and the daydreams began once more over the familiar cases of type.
Even in Steele himself we may observe with what sureness of instinct the men of that age turned aside at the contact of anything likely to make them, in any sense, forget themselves.
It sent him into the trees again--into the lower terrace where he could watch the ground below and catch with ears and nose the first intimation of actual contact with his quarry.