contagious

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contagious

1. (of a disease) capable of being passed on by direct contact with a diseased individual or by handling clothing, etc., contaminated with the causative agent
2. (of an organism) harbouring or spreading the causative agent of a transmissible disease
References in periodicals archive ?
In March the pair, known for their contagiously joyful group works, re-envisioned the project as a collective response of survivors to the tragedy.
Scrabble, on the other hand, can be contagiously competitive.
Days, the girls swarm and shriek and race down the halls; in class, compelled to be silent, they fidget or preen contagiously in ripples that swell and ebb.
A Newcastle goal really would have cranked things up and James Milner's power shot was held at the second attempt by Martyn with nerves spreading contagiously.
Among uninsured banks, a panic starts with runs on individual distressed banks, and then spreads contagiously to unrelated and sometimes healthy banks.
2), although dredging effort was significantly contagiously distributed in all plots ([alpha] = 0.
No one knows exactly why people yawn contagiously, but recent research suggests that the roughly 50 percent of adult humans who do it are more empathetic than those who don't.
As discussions between the MTNA, CFMTA, and RCM have progressed--evaluating the viability of and reasons for a collaborative event--enthusiasm for the possibilities has grown contagiously," Clarke Macintosh, executive director of the Royal Conservatory of Music Examinations, says.
To adequately convey aesthetic effect is in fact to transmit its experience contagiously rather than to clearly identify it, as Burke explains in the case of sublime language:
William H Macy is a man so contagiously unlucky a casino hires him as a 'cooler' to kill off others' winning streaks.
The poems arrange, too, with Commoner's laws of ecology, and contagiously spread their earthy wisdom through the inescapable attraction of their dictional and syntactical idiosyncrasy, aligning, by extension, with the idiosyncrasy of the landscape--the "dappledness" and "counterness" of our own earth.