content


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content

the meaning or significance of a poem, painting, or other work of art, as distinguished from its style or form

content

[′kän‚tent]
(mathematics)

content

On the Internet, content is any information that is available for retrieval by the user, including Web pages, images, music, audio, white papers, driver and software downloads as well as training, educational and reference materials.
References in classic literature ?
Nevertheless, if such be your least offer, I must be content.
And as experience shows, many have been the conspiracies, but few have been successful; because he who conspires cannot act alone, nor can he take a companion except from those whom he believes to be malcontents, and as soon as you have opened your mind to a malcontent you have given him the material with which to content himself, for by denouncing you he can look for every advantage; so that, seeing the gain from this course to be assured, and seeing the other to be doubtful and full of dangers, he must be a very rare friend, or a thoroughly obstinate enemy of the prince, to keep faith with you.
He locked himself again in the turret-room, and laid the opened chest on a table, and in the darkness began to unpack it, laying out the contents, which were mainly of metal and glass--great pieces in strange forms--on another table.
The great majority are perfectly content to do the ordinary thing.
In the second case, if freedom were possible without inevitability we should have arrived at unconditioned freedom beyond space, time, and cause, which by the fact of its being unconditioned and unlimited would be nothing, or mere content without form.
In a field one summer's day a Grasshopper was hopping about, chirping and singing to its heart's content.
19) Gemoll explains that Hermes, having offered all the meat as sacrifice to the Twelve Gods, remembers that he himself as one of them must be content with the savour instead of the substance of the sacrifice.
The reader must, therefore, content himself with the most remarkable incidents, and perhaps he may very well excuse the rest.
Every psychical phenomenon is characterized by what the scholastics of the Middle Ages called the intentional (also the mental) inexistence of an object, and what we, although with not quite unambiguous expressions, would call relation to a content, direction towards an object (which is not here to be understood as a reality), or immanent objectivity.
It happened one day that I passed a tree under which lay several dry gourds, and catching one up I amused myself with scooping out its contents and pressing into it the juice of several bunches of grapes which hung from every bush.
The contents increased my wonder; for this is how the letter ran:
Many of these I had often seen in the hands of the natives, and their contents had been examined in my presence.