contentious

(redirected from contentiously)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal.
Related to contentiously: Controversion

contentious

Law relating to a cause or legal business that is contested, esp a probate matter
References in periodicals archive ?
Annie Duke also talked to the studio about her Celebrity Apprentice heads-up against comedienne Joan Rivers while Neil Channing contentiously announced the Black Belt Poker pros on air causing a huge outpouring of opinion on online poker forums.
Though I must report, honestly and contentiously, that Ben's critical faculties are slightly askew when it comes to ice-cream.
This argument goes substantially beyond special pleading for tapestries to be taken seriously in the list of types of visual productions Henry VIII had at his disposal: for Campbell argues, contentiously, that the figurative media of painting and print were always secondary to tapestry in the king's order of priorities, as measured by cost, numbers, and size.
Smitty (David Pasquesi) still lives, contentiously, with his ex-wife and believes he has a chance with her college-age niece (delusion is what passes for ambition here).
But the costs for an employer add up: for an employee on 20,000 [pounds sterling] that amounts to 4,000 [pounds sterling] plus National Insurance--or, expressed more contentiously, I the equivalent of a 20% bonus that pregnant colleagues earn and non-pregnant ones don't,
Its existence and size have been argued contentiously for several years.
Various legislatures here and overseas have spent years wrestling with what to do with 'excess' IVF embryos and how to approve their use in research, most contentiously embryonic stem cell research.
What is not quite so clear, is what is the knowledge and, more contentiously, how do people obtain relevant knowledge?
He implied that the media had portrayed them stereo typically and contentiously.
Nicholas Howe's entertaining account of historicism uses some easy targets (Ritchie Girvan and Bernard Huppe) as stalking-horses; more contentiously, he suggests that no one should attempt to date or interpret Beowulf on the basis of historical context (p.
More contentiously, though, Robert Darnton's conviction of his material's importance has led him to seem to claim that because readers were more swayed by accessible dirty books than by the considered prose of, say, Montesquieu, those who have studied the 'High Enlightenment' (Darnton's term) have somehow been wasting their time.