continent formation

continent formation

[¦känt·ən¦ent·əl fər′mā·shən]
(geology)
A series of six or seven major episodes, resulting from the buildup of radioactive heat and then the melting or partial melting of the earth's interior; the molten rock melt rises to the surface, differentiating into less primitive lavas; the continent then nucleates, differentiates, and grows from oceanic crust and mantle.
References in periodicals archive ?
A research led by a University of Calgary geophysicist provided strong evidence against continent formation above a hot mantle plume, similar to an environment that presently exists beneath the Hawaiian Islands.
The topics include Vishnu basement rocks of the upper Granite Gorge: continent formation 1.
The theory of plate tectonics holds that the Earth's geological processes, from earthquakes and volcanoes to mountain-building and continent formation, are the result of the slow movements of a dozen or so gigantic slabs that shift over the asthenosphere, a molten region of the upper mantle.
The possible presence of granite also suggests that tectonic plate movement and continent formation may have occurred on Venus, as well as recycling of water and carbon between the planet's mantle and atmosphere.