continue

(redirected from continued)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Wikipedia.
Related to continued: Continued proportion, Continued fractions

continue

A programming statement that points to the beginning of the loop that it is in. In the following C example, the continue statements point to the top of the while loop. The } brace at the end of the loop also points to the top of the loop.

   while (1)
   {
   get_next_input();
   if (end_of_file) 
        exit_routine();
   if (type=='1') 
       {
       process1_routine();
       continue;
       }
   else if (type=='2')
       {
       process2_routine();
       continue;
       }
   else display_type_error()
   }

continue

When used as a control instruction, it should be followed by another word(s) clarifying what is expected of the pilot. Examples: “continue taxi,” “continue descent,” or “continue inbound.”
References in classic literature ?
He paused and turned his head quickly toward a thicket, and then bent his eyes suspiciously on their guide, who continued his steady pace, in undisturbed gravity.
The very same," I groaned, "there is no mistake; and now," I continued, "I want you to sell me that petticoat and those stockings," and I took a couple of sovereigns from my purse.
Monsieur," continued the prisoner, "I am the Abbe Faria, born at Rome.
Raoul continued his way and was visibly gaining ground; but the horse and its rider, of whom he did not lose sight, were evidently sinking.
Surely," continued Charlotte, in a low tone to her friend, "George had better not play, looking so ill as he does.
There have been many battles fought lately,” continued Marmaduke,
Riviere continued to study him with tentative eyes.
Seeing that,' he continued, 'one may, in awkward circumstances, or in a troublesome position, have one's doublet on one's shoulder, and not desire to take one's doublet off - '"
If Buonaparte remains on the throne of France a year longer," the vicomte continued, with the air of a man who, in a matter with which he is better acquainted than anyone else, does not listen to others but follows the current of his own thoughts, "things will have gone too far.
From then on until noon of the second day, it continued to drop until it became as uncomfortably cold as it had been unbearably hot before.
That personage nodded to him upon his entrance and continued to dictate a letter.
I told her, of course," Aynesworth continued, "that having been in your service for a few hours only, I was scarcely in a position to know.