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CARE

(Cooperative for Assistance and Relief Everywhere), nonprofit, nonsectarian federation of agencies devoted to channeling relief and self-help materials to needy people in foreign countries. Organized in the United States (1945) to help war-ravaged Europe, CARE soon expanded its program to include developing nations in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Famous for its "CARE packages" of food and other necessities, CARE in now also involved in population, health care, land management, and small economic activity. It is now an international organization with 10 member countries and headquarters in Brussels.

care

  1. the work involved in supporting people who, because of physical frailty chronic illness or other forms of incapacity and disability, are incapable of leading an autonomous existence.
  2. other kinds of carework, e.g. in child-rearing (see CHILD CARE) and DOMESTIC LABOUR. This should be distinguished from care in sense 1.
Care in sense 1 operates over a wide range of social relations. A clear dividing line can be drawn between formal and informal care (see Abrams, 1978) as it exists in contemporary industrial societies. Formal care refers to services provided by agents of organization (statutory, voluntary and/or private) to people within clearly defined categories of need. Informal care is personally directed towards certain people who have a social relationship with their carer - usually a family member, and most often a spouse (Parker, 1993), or female relative.

Feminist sociologists (see also FEMINISM) have had a major impact on the understanding of care and caring relationships. They have argued that caring is ‘a gendered concept’ and that women constitute the majority of carers both informally, in the private sphere, and as low-paid care workers (‘care assistants’) in the formal sector (Finch and Groves, 1982; Ungerson, 1987; Lewis and Meredith, 1988). Studies of caring have examined the complex reasons why women care and the particular problems and difficulties they face. Social policies involving decarceration and COMMUNITY CARE, the decline of neighbour-hood and COMMUNITY associated with increasing SOCIAL (and geographical) MOBILITY, have placed an increasing burden on individual women carers. There is some evidence that women are reluctant to enter caring relationships with female relatives but lack viable alternatives (Cotterill, 1994). Recent research using data from the 1980 British General Household Survey has also pointed to the significant contribution made by male carers, particularly men who care for their wives (Arber and Gilbert, 1989).

care, custody, and control

Describes a standard exclusion in liability insurance policies. Under this exclusion, the liability insurance does not apply to damage to property in the care or custody of the insured, or to damage to property over which the insured is for any purpose exercising physical control.

CARE

agency devoted to channeling relief to needy people abroad. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 456]

care

in (or into) care Social welfare made the legal responsibility of a local authority by order of a court
References in periodicals archive ?
Although this book does not claim to present a comprehensive solution, it does offer a convincing analysis and appraisal of the current continuing care system.
But nurses, doctors and legislators ask why, then, are patients with mental illness "boarded'' in hospital emergency rooms -- 3,500 per month -- and stuck in acute care behavioral health beds for an average of 30 days before they can get into an available continuing care bed.
Anyone who has a continuing care funding assessment coming up should take a professional along who understands how the system works to ensure they get a fair hearing and the outcome is fair and right.
8220;We looked at many different vendors in the market, but HEALTHCAREfirst offered the most comprehensive offering of software solutions and services that truly met our needs,” said Paul Veillon, Chief Financial Officer of CHRISTUS Continuing Care.
Our members say they are struggling to implement the two-stage process for assessing continuing care health needs in a way that is transparent and fair.
The first part builds a case for continuing care in addiction treatment and has two chapters.
They had children who could not be left unattended or work hours that did not accommodate continuing care meetings.
We're receiving a growing number of enquiries seeking assistance to challenge continuing care decisions.
The new plant will provide all of the heating and cooling needs of the Hospital and Continuing Care Center, as well a significant portion of their electricity needs.
of Pennsylvania/Penn Center on the Continuum of Care in the Addictions) makes a case for, and provides examples of and research evidence for, new adaptive models of continuing care which entail long-term monitoring, flexible alternatives to the "our way or the highway" mentality for treatment options, and greater emphasis on self-care.
If your needs are mainly medical rather than nursing or social, the NHS can meet these needs through NHS continuing care funding.
Webster Continuing Care has unveiled plans to turn the 91-acre parcel on Route 33 in Stratham that is currently home to Great Bay Community College into a continuing care retirement community.

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