infusion

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Related to continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion: insulin pump

infusion

Med introduction of a liquid, such as a saline solution, into a vein or the subcutaneous tissues of the body

Infusion

 

a liquid medicinal preparation; a water extract of a plant substance. Infusions are prepared from various parts of plants (leaves, flowers, grasses) that contain active substances. They include admixtures known as ballast substances (sugar, mucus, amaroids, tannins, pigments) and are used internally and, less frequently, externally (for example, gargling).

infusion

[in′fyü·zhən]
(chemistry)
The aqueous solution of a soluble constituent of a substance as the result of the substance's steeping in the solvent for a period of time.
(medicine)
The slow injection of a solution into a vein or into subcutaneous or other tissue of the body.
References in periodicals archive ?
Less severe hypoglycaemia, better metabolic control, and improved quality of life in Type 1 diabetes mellitus with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) therapy; an observational study of 100 consecutive patients followed for a mean of 2 years.
Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion in the treatment of children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus.
Sustained metabolic control and low rates of severe hypoglycaemic episodes in preschool diabetic children treated with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion.
The study enrolled subjects who were in generally good health and used a continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion pump as the primary route of insulin administration.
In the study, "Sustained Improvements in Hemoglobin A1C During Long-Term Treatment With Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion (CSII) in Pediatric Patients," 102 type 1 diabetes patients (mean age 12.
These preliminary results represent the first reported experience in a clinical trial where patients received rHuPH20 enzyme combined with an insulin analog as a continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) over 72 hours administered with an insulin pump.
The study, "Basal Insulin: Continuous Glucose Monitoring Reveals Less Overnight Hypoglycemia with Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion than with Glargine," was designed to compare glycemic control in patients using an insulin pump to those using injections of glargine for basal control (background insulin delivered around the clock) and insulin lispro at mealtimes.
8) Using continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion therapy for Type 2 diabetes mellitus patients may lead to improved glycemic control.

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