contraction joint

contraction joint

[kən′trak·shən ‚jȯint]
(civil engineering)
A break designed in a structure to allow for drying and temperature shrinkage of concrete, brickwork, or masonry, thereby preventing the formation of cracks.

contraction joint

1. An expansion joint, 1.
2. A joint between adjacent parts of a structure which permits movement between them resulting from contraction.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition to these predictive abilities, the software developers added modules for predicting the potential of early-age damage to JPCP and bonded concrete overlays, guidelines for timing contraction joint sawing, guidelines for early traffic loading of JPCP, and evaporation rate guidelines to predict the potential for moisture loss in portland cement concrete pavements.
Continuously reinforced concrete pavement (CRCP) refers to concrete pavement that is reinforced with steel and constructed without transverse contraction joints.
The tapered shape permits parallel and perpendicular movement at the construction or saw-cut contraction joint, eliminating restraint of the concrete.
This can result in vertical cracks appearing in the internal and external walls if expansion and contraction joints are not correctly installed during the construction of the building.
Tenders are invited for Night work: Chapter NPK: 111/113/117/221/222/223/237 - Milling surface road: 7,300 m2 - Milling surface rear: 550 m2 - Terminators 460 m - ACT & B 22H 1,680 t - AC 8H 480 t - Contraction joints create 800 m - New sludge collector 3 pcs - Covers SS, ES and KS 44 pcs No
Temperatures ranging from 0AC to 50AC are routinely experienced in the area, which meant that using normal expansion and contraction joints to make the structure watertight would have presented some problems.
Betonplattenherstellung approximately 44 000 mA;: Longitudinal contraction joints produce approximately 20 000 m;: Transverse contraction joints produce approximately 10 000 m;: Asphalt produced about 750 mA;: Marker produce approximately 20 000 m.