contradictory

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contradictory

1. Logic (of a pair of statements) unable both to be true or both to be false under the same circumstances
2. Logic a statement that cannot be true when a given statement is true or false when it is false
References in periodicals archive ?
Hyde's reviews and articles in Disputed Ground are evidence that women's writing was being published, and so was much of her own; to read back and forth between the two introductory essays and the contradictoriness of style and opinion in the journalism, however, is to confront questions about what could be written, and what would be paid for.
This entails the insight that prophecy and the history it reveals are fraught with all the ambiguity and contradictoriness of the human heart itself.
Rather, as he says, it "articulates the misgivings we ourselves have felt" about the contradictoriness of the world and the inscrutability of the divine purpose.
And, finally, that in the latter judgments, this built-in contradictoriness is suspect, because of the dubious--as I believe--identification of ordinarily-experienced space and scientific or geometric space (assuming "geometric space" makes sense).
a self that shares in all of the contradictoriness of the national self.
One of the features of Ravensong that my recent class in Canadian Native literature commented on most was its contradictoriness.
Hence the gestural dimension of Saville's painting supplements the image even as it negates it--an ambiguity on a par with the inherent contradictoriness of her handling, which ranges from considered to spontaneous.
The deepest significance of the idea of God is the coherence and unity the idea brings to the manifoldedness and contradictoriness of things.
our anthology portrays southern writers less in terms of an evolving national literary consensus than in relation to the multiplicity, the complexity, and even the contradictoriness of the nation's developing literary consciousness.
They are signs of its demiurgic force in "sculpting" the cosmos in all its contradictoriness.
In their contradictoriness and self-contradictoriness, they also stand--or float--on a frontier of feeling.
Contradictoriness within a thing is the fundamental cause of its development, while its interrelations and interactions with other things are secondary causes" (Prynne 2011, 8).