contrary

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contrary

1. (esp of wind) adverse; unfavourable
2. (of plant parts) situated at right angles to each other
3. Logic (of a pair of propositions) related so that they cannot both be true at once, although they may both be false together
4. Logic a statement that cannot be true when a given statement is true
References in periodicals archive ?
This contrariness continues in the recent Salt Companion to Mina Loy, ed.
I wanted to tell her to put that thing away, but she didn't look like she stood much contrariness.
In this relative lack, negation, and contrariness, we see the principles of me on and thateron implicitly at work.
The stock reasons they don't like him are racism, personal and political jealousy, partisan politics, fear of change and just plain contrariness.
49] The probability of a substantive indigenous or modern feminist movement in Kashmir is examined in Spivakian (3) terms [124], illuminated through the contrariness of "Reminiscences about Women's Agential Roles or Lack thereof, 1947 and 1989" [116], and the "Conceptualization and Crystallization of Women's Agency" [113].
AT the risk of aggravating my reputation for contrariness yet further, I'm going to say that I quite like the new Newcastle United away strip.
That means the kind of wilful contrariness which leads him to randomly say: "The Mercury Music Prize can shove their trophy up their ass.
Journal For Plague Lovers is, if nothing else, a fiercely uncommercial effort that, in following 2007's hugely successful Send Away The Tigers, could only have been the next logical step from a band that has always revelled in its own contrariness.
Some parties seek to depart from "alternative medicine," claiming that the very name is pejorative and by definition perpetuates the dualism and contrariness of the two forms of medicine.
Yes, it might seem wilfully contrary behaviour, but it's a contrariness that, when you hear it, can be overwhelmingly exhilarating.
Craig clearly relishes a certain contrariness in the city and its people that is certainly one of her own most salient characteristics.
It faces up to many of the contradictions of this long-time enthusiast for Maurras's Action francaise, while offering "a theological point of view that helps explain the novelist's contrariness and political inconsistency" (7).