contrast

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contrast

1. (in painting) the effect of the juxtaposition of different colours, tones, etc.
2. 
a. (of a photographic emulsion) the degree of density measured against exposure used
b. the extent to which adjacent areas of an optical image, esp on a television screen or in a photographic negative or print, differ in brightness
3. Psychol the phenomenon that when two different but related stimuli are presented close together in space and/or time they are perceived as being more different than they really are

Contrast

A juxtaposition of dissimilar elements to show the differences of form or color, or to set in opposition in order to emphasize the differences.

Contrast

 

in psychology, the subjective exaggeration of the differences between perceived objects or between certain sectors of the visual field during their spatial (simultaneous contrast) or temporal (successive contrast) contiguity. Thus, when the color black is placed next to white it seems even blacker. Contrast may also be manifested in color change. For example, a gray square on a red background seems greenish blue; on a blue background it looks orange. The sharpest contrast of two colors is expressed at the boundary of the two areas (boundary contrast). The phenomenon of assimilation is the opposite of contrast. Contrast is widely used in various forms of art and literature.

REFERENCES

Vudvorts, R. Eksperimental’naia psikhologiia. Moscow, 1950.
Teplov, B. M. “Vzaimodeistvie odnovremennykh svetovykh oschchushchenii.” In Zritel’nye oshchushcheniia i vospriiatiia. Moscow-Leningrad, 1935.

contrast

[′kän‚trast]
(communications)
The degree of difference in tone between the lightest and darkest areas in a television or facsimile picture.
(computer science)
In optical character recognition, the difference in color, reflectance, or shading between two areas of a surface, for example,a character and its background.

contrast

The white level of a display screen. The contrast adjusts how bright the white is. See brightness and contrast ratio.
References in classic literature ?
Contact with the stage, almost throughout its history, presents itself as a kind of touchstone, to bring out the bizarrerie, the theatrical tricks and contrasts, of the actual world.
The city of contrasts: north and south, east and west, the city of social contrasts.
The next to follow was a copying-clerk, who presented a strange contrast to the virtuous Phellion.
In painful contrast to them stands commonplaceness, always a fatal fault.
She began almost to feel a dislike of Edward; and it ended, as every feeling must end with her, by carrying back her thoughts to Willoughby, whose manners formed a contrast sufficiently striking to those of his brother elect.
not only as abounding with characters whose very names were sure to attract general attention, but as affording a striking contrast betwixt the Saxons, by whom the soil was cultivated, and the Normans, who still reigned in it as conquerors, reluctant to mix with the vanquished, or acknowledge themselves of the same stock.
The day seemed, by contrast with my recent confinement, dazzlingly bright, the sky a glowing blue.
And this noisiness, this exultation at the moment of the ship's departure, make a tremendous contrast to the silent moments of her arrival in a foreign roadstead - the silent moments when, stripped of her sails, she forges ahead to her chosen berth, the loose canvas fluttering softly in the gear above the heads of the men standing still upon her decks, the master gazing intently forward from the break of the poop.
It often grieved her to the heart to think of the contrast between them; to think that where nature had made so little difference, circumstances should have made so much, and that her mother, as handsome as Lady Bertram, and some years her junior, should have an appearance so much more worn and faded, so comfortless, so slatternly, so shabby.
Oh, he is a great contrast to me, I have no doubt" said Newman.
By way of contrast, there is a lovely English girl, with eyes as shy as violets, and a voice as sweet
I will not dissemble what real pleasure his sight afforded me, nor how strongly I felt the contrast between his person and manners and those of Reginald, to the infinite disadvantage of the latter.