convent


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

convent:

see monasticismmonasticism
, form of religious life, usually conducted in a community under a common rule. Monastic life is bound by ascetical practices expressed typically in the vows of celibacy, poverty, and obedience, called the evangelical counsels.
..... Click the link for more information.
.

convent

1. A religious community: friars, monks, or nuns (now usually nuns).
2. A group of buildings occupied by such a community.

convent

1. a building inhabited by a religious community, usually of nuns
2. the religious community inhabiting such a building
3. a school in which the teachers are nuns
References in classic literature ?
The sisters in the convent used to tell me of a day of judgment, when everything is coming to light;--won't there be vengeance, then!
My gold collar,'' answered the Prior, ``against ten buts of Chian wine; they are mine as securely as if they were already in the convent vaults, under the key of old Dennis the cellarer.
They all spent their time in spinning, and that is why the convent has this name.
The next day his friend sent intelligence of his death to his relatives, who had already ascertained his misfortune, as well as the convent where Camilla lay almost on the point of accompanying her husband on that inevitable journey, not on account of the tidings of his death, but because of those she received of her lover's departure.
I entered through the convent gate: The abbot bade me welcome there, And in the court of silent dreams I lost the thread of worldly care.
He flew, then, rather than walked, toward the convent of the Carmes Dechausses, or rather Deschaux, as it was called at that period, a sort of building without a window, surrounded by barren fields--an accessory to the Preaux-Clercs, and which was generally employed as the place for the duels of men who had no time to lose.
The parlour of the convent would not open until morning, and surely a delay would annoy Madame, so, in spite of her desire to see the other child, she went home.
I write by the same courier to our worthy friend Aramis in his convent.
My Father was a native of Ireland and an inhabitant of Wales; my Mother was the natural Daughter of a Scotch Peer by an italian Opera-girl--I was born in Spain and received my Education at a Convent in France.
In my youth, London, my lord, then, about 1635, I made a pleasure trip to Scotland; and lastly, in 1648, I lived for some time at Newcastle, particularly in the convent, the gardens of which are now occupied by your army.
Many were the inquiries she was eager to make of Miss Tilney; but so active were her thoughts, that when these inquiries were answered, she was hardly more assured than before, of Northanger Abbey having been a richly endowed convent at the time of the Reformation, of its having fallen into the hands of an ancestor of the Tilneys on its dissolution, of a large portion of the ancient building still making a part of the present dwelling although the rest was decayed, or of its standing low in a valley, sheltered from the north and east by rising woods of oak.
She spent the most of her childhood in the convent of Argenteuil --never heard of Argenteuil before, but suppose there was really such a place.