convent

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convent:

see monasticismmonasticism
, form of religious life, usually conducted in a community under a common rule. Monastic life is bound by ascetical practices expressed typically in the vows of celibacy, poverty, and obedience, called the evangelical counsels.
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convent

1. A religious community: friars, monks, or nuns (now usually nuns).
2. A group of buildings occupied by such a community.

convent

1. a building inhabited by a religious community, usually of nuns
2. the religious community inhabiting such a building
3. a school in which the teachers are nuns
References in periodicals archive ?
Valerie Warr, then Valerie Coghlan, was well aware of that when she left her convent school to take a degree in mechanical engineering at Liverpool university.
I don't think there is anything quite like a convent education and I think it is sad that convent schools like Seafielddon't exist any more.
TV's Queen of Mean, Merseyside born Anne Robinson, has no doubt where she got her ``bolshi'' attitude -as a boarder in a convent school.
But in her convent school, there was no such thing as trying to find the best in someone, she says -quite the opposite in fact.
During the latter half of the nineteenth century and the early decades of the twentieth, a large number of affluent non-Catholic girls attended convent schools to receive a 'high" or 'good education' by the standards of the time.
Papers delivered at the Australasian Catholic Congress in 1911 demonstrate that order-owned convent schools were generally renowned for their great interest in academic standards and educational trends.
Burley's research concludes that between 1880 and 1925, the atmosphere in convent schools 'imbued some students with the idea of better jobs and being upwardly mobile'.
In Australia, girls in convent schools were not simply trained to be good wives mad mothers, as the dominant rhetoric suggests.
The convent schools would be successful because the Sisters were not daunted by the initial difficulties and were able to satisfy the needs of many young Acadian women and their parents.
However, some parents actively supported the convent schools.
17) As more schools in Acadian areas closed when local officials either would not or could not collect taxes for the secular school system, more convent schools opened.
At 18, she became a nun in the Loreto teaching order and moved to India to teach in its convent schools.