convent

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convent:

see monasticismmonasticism
, form of religious life, usually conducted in a community under a common rule. Monastic life is bound by ascetical practices expressed typically in the vows of celibacy, poverty, and obedience, called the evangelical counsels.
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convent

1. A religious community: friars, monks, or nuns (now usually nuns).
2. A group of buildings occupied by such a community.

convent

1. a building inhabited by a religious community, usually of nuns
2. the religious community inhabiting such a building
3. a school in which the teachers are nuns
References in periodicals archive ?
47) The early Presentation Sisters in Ireland taught their students a variety of handcrafts, such as lace-making This enabled girls to earn their own living A number of useful local industries thus stemmed from convent schools in Ireland
Girls' 'high' schools in England in the late eighteenth century followed a similar programme to the French convent school, but were more utilitarian in approach, as Theobald's work suggests.
This appears to be the first carefully planned convent school for the further education of girls.
Jeanne's convent school establishment, from which the modern girls' secondary college is directly derived, was the first adaptation of the Jesuit's Ratio by a woman, for the education of women.
These students were the first convent school candidates recorded in Australia, one of whom was awarded a silver medal for an outstanding pass in French.
39) Convent school Annals reveal that by this time their ex-pupils were prominent among women who secured careers in teaching and nursing, business mad the public service.
The experiences of the Sisters in Caraquet are a good example of the problems that followed the opening of the convent schools.
The convent schools were reflecting and encouraging the changing role of women and in the process, the attitude towards convents in the Moniteur began to alter.
More research is needed to measure the full effect of the convent schools, but they obviously helped more women get at least an elementary education.
By 1871, there were thirty and by 1881, when the convent schools had time to develop a clientele and to produce some teachers qualified for the public school system, the number of older students had risen to eight-two.
The convent schools encouraged their students to develop their own talents.
All the convent schools in Acadian areas took both francophone and anglophone students.