conventicle


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conventicle

1. a secret or unauthorized assembly for worship
2. a small meeting house or chapel for a religious assembly, esp of Nonconformists or Dissenters
References in periodicals archive ?
These were Scotland's "Killing Times" and anyone caught attending a conventicle faced a heavy fine, imprisonment, transportation and even death.
I slipped about the chalky lane That runs without the park, I saw the lone conventicle A beacon in the dark.
Bunyan began his work while in the Bedfordshire county prison for violations of the Conventicle Act, which prohibited the holding of religious services outside the auspices of the established Church of England.
Locke escribe en un momento en el que, promulgada la Conventicle Act de 1664, se buscaba en Inglaterra la marginalizacion de todos aquellos que no fueran anglicanos y alejarlos de los cargos publicos, asi como restarles sus derechos en tanto subditos de su majestad.
This time, given our imperative to explore both outer space and the micro-space of quantum dynamics, there is the very likely possibility that the scope of a future conventicle could be the entire physical universe and all of its inhabitants.
13) The Clarendon Code consisted of the Corporation Act (1661 repealed 1828), which required all municipal officer holders to be communicant member of the Church of England and to reject the Solemn League and Covenant, The Act of Uniformity (1662) which compelled uniformity of worship through a prescribed Book of Common Prayer for all clergy, The Conventicle Act (1664) which forbad meetings for unauthorised worship, The Five Mile Act (1665 repealed 1812), which forbad nonconforming ministers from coming within five miles of incorporated towns and from teaching in schools.
The Quaker Act of 1662 was a regulation to ensure the Oath of Allegiance to king and country, while the Conventicle Act of 1664 and of 1670 were means to discourage the assemblies of nonconformist sects.
The obvious illustration would involve the familiar (Coleridgean) distinction between the Bunyan of Parnassus and the Bunyan of the Conventicle.
O[AKLEY]: I'll put on my bonnet and go to the Conventicle and get Mr.
John Bunyan: Conventicle and Parnassus: Tercentenary Essays.
The church, then, is not a theological symposium nor a conventicle of mystics.
Two kings, Charles II (1674) and James II (1685), employed "the dispensing powers of the Crown" to confirm the Jews' religious freedom that was twice tested under the penal laws of the Conventicle Act.