conventicle


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conventicle

1. a secret or unauthorized assembly for worship
2. a small meeting house or chapel for a religious assembly, esp of Nonconformists or Dissenters
References in periodicals archive ?
You can still see them in the poorer parts of our cities: street corner conventicles with names like Hope Mission, Zion Hall, Bethel and Bethesda.
The Lords tried to raise the defining figure for a conventicle from five persons to 10, but this amendment was rejected by the Commons.
At the same time that the conventicles gained popularity and drew ever more lay adherents, the opponents of the new movement became more vocal and vehement in their criticisms.
By the 1720s the Swedish Church moved within the Riksdag to craft a punitive code of law aimed at extirpating pietist conventicles.
Richard Tidmarsh was a controversial local politician and early pastor of the Baptist conventicle.
Unlike Calvin, who was wary of the use of allegory, they do not admit the possibility of a conflict between what Coleridge called in Bunyan the man of the Conventicle and the man of Parnassus.
Both heresy and schism, or even the term conventicle, denote the ecclesiastical identity of these bodies vis-a-vis the one, holy, catholic and apostolic church and constitute a continuous invitation for their return to the unity of the ecclesiastical body.
14) The word "circle" suggests an analogy with a sodality of Renaissance humanists who cultivated in their gatherings a combination of friendship, reading and writing, (15) or it evokes a seventeenth-century Pietist conventicle, whose members met for discussion of Scripture, singing and praying, while at the same time being reluctant to claim the theological quality of a visible church for these more or less informal gatherings.
Although conventicle meetings in homes were outlawed in 1690, Kevorkian shows how the Pietists maintained an informal "shadow network" (169) until at least the 1730s.
For Sire and Stachniewski, Bunyan's Calvinist belief in predestination is so repulsive, allegedly for inducing mental torture over the status of one's election, that the only serious avenue for reading Bunyan today is to follow Samuel Taylor Coleridge's cue and forsake the Bunyan of the conventicle for the Bunyan of Parnassus.