conventional

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conventional

1. Law based upon the agreement or consent of parties
2. Arts represented in a simplified or generalized way; conventionalized
3. Bridge another word for convention
References in periodicals archive ?
Let us now apply our conventionalist framework to the effect that nanotechnology may have on privacy.
Finally, in his symposium piece in this issue, Professor Merrill argues that conventionalism leads to judicial restraint more than textualism and thus that conservatives, as advocates of judicial restraint, ought to be conventionalists.
A great deal of the culture of Campus Conventionalist logic is concerned with power.
92) Conventionalists would insist that in such a case, "the Court should have made plain to the public the exceptional nature of its decision, that it should have admitted it was changing the law for nonlegal reasons.
While Test matches draw the purists, ODI cricket attracts mostly the conventionalists.
Conventionalists about promising believe that it is wrong to break a promise because the promisor takes advantage of a social convention only to fail to do his part in maintaining it.
In the eyes of the conventionalists, then, a non-intentionalistic approach to literature does not necessarily lead to an anything-goes attitude concerning the attribution of meaning.
The author asserts in the Book that markets are unable to allocate resources automatically until self-interest, as proposed by the conventionalists, is brought into the interplay of market forces.
Similarly, 'conservative conventionalists attempt to preserve existent theories by building onto them ever more elaborate (critics would label them ad hoc) peripheral systems' (Caldwell, 1980: 367).
Yet the activity of classical political philosophy with respect to this very concern, our immortality, is overlooked by those who view classical political philosophy, as Murray does, as a historically necessary (and historically limited) defense of the city's justice against the critique of ancient conventionalists, a defense that ends in the fatal monism of the polis.