conventional

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conventional

1. Law based upon the agreement or consent of parties
2. Arts represented in a simplified or generalized way; conventionalized
3. Bridge another word for convention
References in periodicals archive ?
Further ambiguity can be found in names of indigenous groups before they became conventionalized during the colonial period: the most confusing perhaps being the group now known as Nara, who were once also known as Lala, Ala'ala, and Pokau, depending on which of their neighbouring groups Europeans happened to be talking to (and for other complications in the vicinity see Jones 1998:9.
If consumers with CD rail to achieve a sufficient level of product literacy so as to be able to engage fully in the regulatory process and in the promotion of the products that they desire, gluten-free products are likely to be conventionalized.
Clearly, then, sick has a highly conventionalized link with the domain of living organisms, particularly humans, as evidenced by, for instance, sick children, sick man, or sick people.
Long before Judith Butler's Gender Trouble, there was Keaton's exposure of masculinity as a set of conventionalized responses to stimuli, responses that could be performed either well or badly.
In such disruptions from conventionalized order, Bakhtin recognized a "temporary liberation" that created "a special type of communication impossible in everyday life" and that "permit[ed] no distance between those who came in contact with each other and liberat[ed] from norms of etiquette and decency imposed at other times" (10).
In the "Conclusion," the ode is discussed at some length, which seems to be a most appropriate summary of the book since "[t]hough being one of the oldest and most conventionalized of genres, the ode contributed to some of the strongest literary innovations of the period" (209).
It has been conventionalized to meet the business and residential needs at the Sudanese market," Carson told about hundred people who attended the launch at Da Vinci hotel.
Conventionalized forms of decoration, including areas of earth pigment staining, as well as a repertoire of painted symbols, endowed the wearer with an important source of spiritual power and protection.
They argue that understanding the pragmatic inferences that can be drawn from what is said is fundamentally important, and such inferences, which are subject to highly conventionalized regularities, are normatively defensible.
If, as Sherman has determined, more than 20 percent of the Huntington Library's collection of early modern editions contain substantial marginal annotation (5), and if many well-used books have been used to death, leaving us with a false sample of pristine copies, then the practice of writing and marking in books must have been widespread and, to some extent, conventionalized.
According to Bernardez, we inherit certain patterns of thought which are already conventionalized from our social ancestors ("Synergy" 27).
The semiotic nature of language, being dialogic in its true sense, constantly recalls a collaborative engagement between language (which contains signs that are confirmed and conventionalized by the system through their internal functioning dialogism and a community of speakers) and that which has the potential capability and dynamism to produce new signs that may be identified as discourse.