converse

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converse

1. Logic
a. a categorical proposition obtained from another by the transposition of subject and predicate, as no bad man is bald from no bald man is bad
b. a proposition so derived, possibly by weakening a universal proposition to the corresponding particular, as some socialists are rich from all rich men are socialists
2. Logic Maths a relation that holds between two relata only when a given relation holds between them in reverse order: thus father of is the converse of son of

converse

[′kän‚vərs]
(mathematics)
The converse of the statement “if p, then q ” is the statement “if q, then p.”

converse

(logic)
The truth of a proposition of the form A => B and its converse B => A are shown in the following truth table:

A B | A => B B => A ------+---------------- f f | t t f t | t f t f | f t t t | t t
References in classic literature ?
I saw Jane Fairfax and conversed with her, with admiration and pleasure alwaysbut with no thought beyond.
He acquiesced in all her decisions, caught all her enthusiasm; and long before his visit concluded, they conversed with the familiarity of a long-established acquaintance.
The only marked event of the afternoon was, that I saw the girl with whom I had conversed in the verandah dismissed in disgrace by Miss Scatcherd from a history class, and sent to stand in the middle of the large schoolroom.
But there they were, in the heart of it; on Change, amongst the merchants; who hurried up and down, and chinked the money in their pockets, and conversed in groups, and looked at their watches, and trifled thoughtfully with their great gold seals; and so forth, as Scrooge had seen them often.
Wickfield, as she offered none, and we conversed on other subjects until we came to Canterbury, where, as it was market-day, my aunt had a great opportunity of insinuating the grey pony among carts, baskets, vegetables, and huckster's goods.
When we had conversed for a while, Miss Havisham sent us two out to walk in the neglected garden: on our coming in by-and-by, she said, I should wheel her about a little as in times of yore.