conveyance

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conveyance

Law
a. a transfer of the legal title to property
b. the document effecting such a transfer

conveyance

1. The transfer of property from one person to another.
2. The document or instrument by which this transfer is effected.
References in classic literature ?
My thirty years' experience reads those words in a sense exactly opposite to the sense which they are intended to convey.
She curtseyed to him (young ladies made curtseys in those days), with a pretty desire to convey to him that she felt how much older and wiser he was than she.
The length of those five days I can convey no idea of to any one.
He attached no definite meaning to the word that I am aware of, but used it, like his own pretended Christian name, to affront mankind, and convey an idea of something savagely damaging.
Here, however, sat Eppie, discoursing cheerfully to her own small boot, which she was using as a bucket to convey the water into a deep hoof-mark, while her little naked foot was planted comfortably on a cushion of olive-green mud.
Neither has it been possible for the writer of it to render the full force of the Zulu idiom nor to convey a picture of the teller.
By nine o'clock the following morning the fairy tailors, as Nicolete called them, were at work on the fairy clothes, and, at the end of three days, there came by parcel-post a bulky unromantic-looking brown-paper parcel, which it was my business to convey to Nicolete under cover of the dark.
what food Will he convey up thither to sustain Himself and his rash Armie, where thin Aire Above the Clouds will pine his entrails gross, And famish him of Breath, if not of Bread?
But to give their conversation in the original would convey but little information to the modern reader, for whose benefit we beg to offer the following translation:
I cannot convey the sense of abominable desolation that hung over the world.
Pray put no construction on my words I do not mean they should convey, and give them no undue weight.
It is utterly impossible, according to Captain Bonneville, to convey an idea of the effect produced by the sight of such countless throngs of animals of such bulk and spirit, all rushing forward as if swept on by a whirlwind.