conveyance


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conveyance

Law
a. a transfer of the legal title to property
b. the document effecting such a transfer

conveyance

1. The transfer of property from one person to another.
2. The document or instrument by which this transfer is effected.
References in classic literature ?
In such a case there can be no doubt but the specification would amount to an exclusion of any other mode of conveyance, because the woman having no previous power to alienate her property, the specification determines the particular mode which she is, for that purpose, to avail herself of.
I was now myself looking out for the conveyance which was to take me to the Count.
Fogg quietly, "we will, if you please, look about for some means of conveyance to Allahabad.
And here I must admit that I learned very little of drains and bells and modes of conveyance, and the like conveniences, during my time in this real future.
It was the landlord of the Spotted Dog, whose conveyance I had taken.
Morrel; "I will take the first conveyance I find, and hurry to Marseilles, whence I will bring you word how all is going on.
But the joke appeared an excellent one to the citizens, who, seeing the conveyance without escort and unarmed, would never have believed in the possibility of so great an imprudence.
He had heard much of the sagacity of the beaver in cutting down trees, in which, it is said, they manage to make them fall into the water, and in such a position and direction as may be most favorable for conveyance to the desired point.
Miss Emmerson, on the other hand, saw nothing but the anxiety of a careful hireling, willing to promote the interest of his master, who was to be paid for his conveyance by the job--so differently do sixty and sixteen judge the same actions
Many of the American sleighs are elegant though the use of this mode of conveyance is much lessened with the melioration of the climate consequent to the clearing of the forests.
Norris found that all her anxiety to save her brother-in-law's money was vain, and that in spite of her wishes and hints for a less expensive conveyance of Fanny, they were to travel post; when she saw Sir Thomas actually give William notes for the purpose, she was struck with the idea of there being room for a third in the carriage, and suddenly seized with a strong inclination to go with them, to go and see her poor dear sister Price.
Though unable to walk, she had arrived borne aloft in an armchair (her mode of conveyance for the last five years), as brisk, aggressive, self-satisfied, bolt-upright, loudly imperious, and generally abusive as ever.