conveyance

(redirected from conveyances)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial.

conveyance

Law
a. a transfer of the legal title to property
b. the document effecting such a transfer

conveyance

1. The transfer of property from one person to another.
2. The document or instrument by which this transfer is effected.
References in classic literature ?
But the joke appeared an excellent one to the citizens, who, seeing the conveyance without escort and unarmed, would never have believed in the possibility of so great an imprudence.
Many of the American sleighs are elegant though the use of this mode of conveyance is much lessened with the melioration of the climate consequent to the clearing of the forests.
I forthwith expressed that the proper as well as the pleasant and friendly thing would be therefore that on the arrival of the public conveyance I should be in waiting for him with his little sister; an idea in which Mrs.
Now, the spouting canal of the Sperm Whale, chiefly intended as it is for the conveyance of air, and for several feet laid along, horizontally, just beneath the upper surface of his head, and a little to one side; this curious canal is very much like a gas-pipe laid down in a city on one side of a street.
So soon as I could at all collect my thoughts, I sent for Joram, and begged him to provide me a conveyance in which it could be got to London in the night.
a meet conveyance for the crusader, whose doughty arm was to reconquer the Holy Sepulchre
Fogg quietly, "we will, if you please, look about for some means of conveyance to Allahabad.
It was the landlord of the Spotted Dog, whose conveyance I had taken.
He had heard much of the sagacity of the beaver in cutting down trees, in which, it is said, they manage to make them fall into the water, and in such a position and direction as may be most favorable for conveyance to the desired point.
One was the barge which he had brought from Mackinaw; another was of a larger size, such as was formerly used in navigating the Mohawk River, and known by the generic name of the Schenectady barge; the other was a large keel boat, at that time the grand conveyance on the Mississippi.
I think that, for all reasons, you would do well to buy the property and to have the conveyance settled at once.
Her mother perceived, for the first time, that the second vehicle was not a humble conveyance like the first, but a spick-and-span gig or dog-cart, highly varnished and equipped.