copal


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copal

a hard aromatic resin, yellow, orange, or red in colour, obtained from various tropical trees and used in making varnishes and lacquers

Copal

 

a class of natural fossil resins composed primarily of resin acids. Copals are extremely hard, with a high melting point (up to 360°C and higher) and great chemical stability. Their density is 1.03–1.07 g/cm3. The color of copals ranges from colorless to brown. The names of copals are often derived from the places of extraction, for example, Zanzibar, Mozambique, Angola, Borneo, and Brazil copals. Copals are widely used in the manufacture of varnishes. With the appearance of synthetic resins, their importance has decreased.

copal

[′kō·pəl]
(materials)
Hard, resinous substance exuded from certain trees in the East Indies, South America, and Africa and used in varnish and printing ink.

copal

Resin of natural origin used in varnishes to provide gloss and hardness.
References in periodicals archive ?
This raises significant doubts about claims of DNA extraction from fossil insects in amber, many millions of years older than copal.
With Copal Partners track record in equity research, Societe Generale Private Banking will double the coverage by its regular publications, broaden its analysis in all regions : Latin America, US, Western and Eastern Europe, Middle East, Africa and Asia, as well as strengthen its capacities in order to respond to clients' ad-hoc requests on any listed stocks.
Societe Generale Private Banking (SocGen), the wealth management arm of the bank, and Copal Partners are teaming up to strengthen the bank's existing Equity Research offering.
Like its cousins copal and rubber, also collected by tapping trees in the wild, chicle was highly esteemed in Pre-Columbian times for the many everyday uses of the tree's sap as well as its fruit, bark, and leaves.
Outside a troupe of feathered 'Aztec' dancers swirl and twirl into a trance as copal resin emits pungent smoke from small coal fires.
Specific topics include Honduran figurines and whistles in social context, style as cultural imperative in early Olmec figurines from two regions, new fire figurines and the iconography of penitence in Huastec art, the weeping baby and the Nahual corn spirit in Mexico's Huasteca Veracruzana, and a comparison of Aztec ceramic figurines with copal figurines from the Templo Mayor.
Here we discovered that a valuable forest of gum copal trees commenced, the tops of which were draped with orchilla weed.
This natural material is closely related to Kauri Copal (used for Kb-value determination) and was used in all initial solubility experiments.
Amber, a fossilized resin imported into North Africa from the Baltic and beyond, was often strung with beads made of copal, a semi-fossilized resin found in West Africa.
Similar to the more familiar practice called "smudging" of the Native Americans of NorthAmerica, for some complaints a curandero may give a person in need a limpia with a tree resin incense called copal (pictured above).
Etimoe, figured etimoe, olumni, allihia, nomatou, ashanti, etedua, buini, gum copal, and salikunda
A cluster from Toluca suggests familial funerary traditions (somewhat outside the Catholic norm) with a son requesting burial next to his father under a copal tree (pp.